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ATP-Binding cassette transporter A1 modulates apolipoprotein A-I transcytosis through aortic endothelial cells


Cavelier, C; Rohrer, L; von Eckardstein, A (2006). ATP-Binding cassette transporter A1 modulates apolipoprotein A-I transcytosis through aortic endothelial cells. Circulation Research, 99(10):1060-1066.

Abstract

High-density lipoproteins and their major protein constituent apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) possess diverse atheroprotective properties. Most of them must be exerted within the arterial wall. Actually, high-density lipoproteins are the most abundant lipoproteins within the arterial intima. We have recently reported that apoA-I is transcytosed through aortic endothelial cells. In the present study, we evaluate the role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) in this process. Using pharmacological interventions and RNA interference, we investigated whether ABCA1 and SR-BI modulate apoA-I binding, internalization and transcytosis in endothelial cells. Upregulation of ABCA1 with oxysterols increased apoA-I binding and internalization. Trapping ABCA1 on the cell surface with cyclosporin A enhanced apoA-I binding but decreased its internalization and transcytosis. In addition, apoA-I binding, internalization, and transcytosis were reduced by at least 50% after silencing ABCA1 but not after knocking down SR-BI. The integrity of the endothelial cell monolayer was affected neither by cyclosporin A treatment nor by ABCA1 silencing, as controlled by measuring inulin permeability. Finally, in ABCA1-GFP-expressing cells, fluorescently labeled apoA-I colocalized intracellularly with ABCA1-GFP. However, apoA-I-containing vesicles did not colocalize with the late endosome marker LAMP-1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein-1). In conclusion, ABCA1, but not SR-BI, modulates the transcytosis of apoA-I through endothelial cells.

Abstract

High-density lipoproteins and their major protein constituent apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) possess diverse atheroprotective properties. Most of them must be exerted within the arterial wall. Actually, high-density lipoproteins are the most abundant lipoproteins within the arterial intima. We have recently reported that apoA-I is transcytosed through aortic endothelial cells. In the present study, we evaluate the role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) in this process. Using pharmacological interventions and RNA interference, we investigated whether ABCA1 and SR-BI modulate apoA-I binding, internalization and transcytosis in endothelial cells. Upregulation of ABCA1 with oxysterols increased apoA-I binding and internalization. Trapping ABCA1 on the cell surface with cyclosporin A enhanced apoA-I binding but decreased its internalization and transcytosis. In addition, apoA-I binding, internalization, and transcytosis were reduced by at least 50% after silencing ABCA1 but not after knocking down SR-BI. The integrity of the endothelial cell monolayer was affected neither by cyclosporin A treatment nor by ABCA1 silencing, as controlled by measuring inulin permeability. Finally, in ABCA1-GFP-expressing cells, fluorescently labeled apoA-I colocalized intracellularly with ABCA1-GFP. However, apoA-I-containing vesicles did not colocalize with the late endosome marker LAMP-1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein-1). In conclusion, ABCA1, but not SR-BI, modulates the transcytosis of apoA-I through endothelial cells.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:10 November 2006
Deposited On:18 Mar 2009 15:23
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 18:38
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0009-7330
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000250567.17569.b3
PubMed ID:17053191

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