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Scanning electron microscope appearances of Lightspeed instruments used clinically: a pilot study.


Marending, M; Lutz, F; Barbakow, F (1998). Scanning electron microscope appearances of Lightspeed instruments used clinically: a pilot study. International Endodontic Journal, 31(1):57-62.

Abstract

The cutting heads of the first 18 instruments in six sets of clinically used Lightspeed instruments (sizes 20-65) were examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Three sets had been used by full-time faculty and discarded as follows: instrument sizes 20-32.5 after 18 treated root canals; instrument sizes 35-47.5 after 36 treated root canals; and instrument sizes 50-65 after 54 treated root canals. Three other sets had been used by a private clinician who discarded all Lightspeed instruments after preparing 20 root canals. The cutting heads of the 108 instruments were examined for the presence of surface debris, metal strips, metal flash, disrupted cutting edges, microfractures, tears, pitting and fretting and fatigue cracks. Fewer instruments ultrasonically cleaned before examination in the SEM had debris than those not cleaned before examination. The prevalence of metal strips and metal flash was similar for both groups. In contrast, microfractures and tears were more prevalent in instruments used by the full-time faculty group, who used their instruments more frequently before discarding them. Pitting and fretting occurred equally frequently in both groups whilst no fatigue cracks were noted in any of the 108 instruments. Overusage of Lightspeed instruments may predispose the flutes of the cutting heads to microfractures and clinicians should be aware of this possibility.

Abstract

The cutting heads of the first 18 instruments in six sets of clinically used Lightspeed instruments (sizes 20-65) were examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Three sets had been used by full-time faculty and discarded as follows: instrument sizes 20-32.5 after 18 treated root canals; instrument sizes 35-47.5 after 36 treated root canals; and instrument sizes 50-65 after 54 treated root canals. Three other sets had been used by a private clinician who discarded all Lightspeed instruments after preparing 20 root canals. The cutting heads of the 108 instruments were examined for the presence of surface debris, metal strips, metal flash, disrupted cutting edges, microfractures, tears, pitting and fretting and fatigue cracks. Fewer instruments ultrasonically cleaned before examination in the SEM had debris than those not cleaned before examination. The prevalence of metal strips and metal flash was similar for both groups. In contrast, microfractures and tears were more prevalent in instruments used by the full-time faculty group, who used their instruments more frequently before discarding them. Pitting and fretting occurred equally frequently in both groups whilst no fatigue cracks were noted in any of the 108 instruments. Overusage of Lightspeed instruments may predispose the flutes of the cutting heads to microfractures and clinicians should be aware of this possibility.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 January 1998
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0143-2885
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2591.1998.t01-1-00104.x
PubMed ID:9823130

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