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Apical inflammatory root resorption: a correlative radiographic and histological assessment.


Laux, M; Abbott, P V; Pajarola, G; Nair, P N R (2000). Apical inflammatory root resorption: a correlative radiographic and histological assessment. International Endodontic Journal, 33(6):483-493.

Abstract

AIM: To assess the reliability of routine single radiographs in the diagnosis of inflammatory apical root resorption by correlating the radiographic and histological findings. METHODOLOGY: The material comprised serial and step serial sections of plastic-embedded root-apices with attached apical periodontitis lesions that were prepared for a previous study and the diagnostic radiographs. The histological sections of 114 specimens were analysed by light microscopy and categorized into three groups: (i) those without any resorption (0); (ii) those with moderate resorption (+); and (iii) those with severe resorption (+ +). The radiographs were examined by a separate examiner and graded with a similar categorization of no resorption (0); moderate (+); and severe (+ +) apical resorption. RESULTS: Radiographically, 19% of the teeth were diagnosed as having apical inflammatory root resorption, whereas histologically, 81% of the teeth revealed apical inflammatory root resorption. A correlative radiographic and histological assessment (n = 104) revealed a coincidence of diagnosis in 7% of the specimens and noncoincidence of diagnosis in 76% of the specimens. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that routine single radiographs are not sufficiently accurate or sensitive to consistently diagnose apical root resorptive defects developing as a consequence of apical periodontitis.

Abstract

AIM: To assess the reliability of routine single radiographs in the diagnosis of inflammatory apical root resorption by correlating the radiographic and histological findings. METHODOLOGY: The material comprised serial and step serial sections of plastic-embedded root-apices with attached apical periodontitis lesions that were prepared for a previous study and the diagnostic radiographs. The histological sections of 114 specimens were analysed by light microscopy and categorized into three groups: (i) those without any resorption (0); (ii) those with moderate resorption (+); and (iii) those with severe resorption (+ +). The radiographs were examined by a separate examiner and graded with a similar categorization of no resorption (0); moderate (+); and severe (+ +) apical resorption. RESULTS: Radiographically, 19% of the teeth were diagnosed as having apical inflammatory root resorption, whereas histologically, 81% of the teeth revealed apical inflammatory root resorption. A correlative radiographic and histological assessment (n = 104) revealed a coincidence of diagnosis in 7% of the specimens and noncoincidence of diagnosis in 76% of the specimens. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that routine single radiographs are not sufficiently accurate or sensitive to consistently diagnose apical root resorptive defects developing as a consequence of apical periodontitis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Institute of Oral Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 November 2000
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:24
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 13:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0143-2885
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2591.2000.00338.x
PubMed ID:11307251

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