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Sensory endings in skin grafts and scars after extensive burns


Stella, M; Calcagni, M; Teich-Alasia, S; Ramieri, G; Cellino, G; Panzica, G (1994). Sensory endings in skin grafts and scars after extensive burns. Burns, 20(6):491-495.

Abstract

Fifteen patients who underwent a split thickness skin graft operation for full thickness burns and six patients with postburn scars were biopsied after a standard aesthesiological examination completed with Weber and Dellon tests. A semiquantitative evaluation was performed on immunohistochemically stained sections to determine the presence or absence of PGP 9.5 immunoreactive intraepithelial fibres, complex sensory receptors, nerve fibres in the dermal papillae, vessel-innervating fibres, gland-innervating fibres, and nerve trunks in the deep dermis. The reinnervation pattern was similar in grafts and scars. With regard to sensory receptors, free nerve endings and Merkel-neurite complexes were observed. Statistical analysis suggested a significant correlation between sensibility and the amount of regenerated nerve structures (particularly in the epidermis and dermal papillae).

Abstract

Fifteen patients who underwent a split thickness skin graft operation for full thickness burns and six patients with postburn scars were biopsied after a standard aesthesiological examination completed with Weber and Dellon tests. A semiquantitative evaluation was performed on immunohistochemically stained sections to determine the presence or absence of PGP 9.5 immunoreactive intraepithelial fibres, complex sensory receptors, nerve fibres in the dermal papillae, vessel-innervating fibres, gland-innervating fibres, and nerve trunks in the deep dermis. The reinnervation pattern was similar in grafts and scars. With regard to sensory receptors, free nerve endings and Merkel-neurite complexes were observed. Statistical analysis suggested a significant correlation between sensibility and the amount of regenerated nerve structures (particularly in the epidermis and dermal papillae).

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25 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1994
Deposited On:13 Mar 2009 08:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:08
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0305-4179
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/0305-4179(94)90003-5
PubMed ID:7880411

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