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Malaria: from prehistory to present


Schlagenhauf, Patricia (2004). Malaria: from prehistory to present. Infectious disease clinics of North America, 18(2):189-205.

Abstract

Malaria is a protozoan (Plasmodium) infection transmitted by the biting female Anopheles mosquito. The disease affects approximately 40% of the world's population, and an estimated 50 to 70 million Western travelers are exposed to malaria infection annually. Malaria and travelers are inextricably linked since the dawn of time. Malaria owes its distribution worldwide to human travelers, and travelers are linked with the discovery, refinement, and development of several antimalarial drugs. In the year 2003 the genomes for humans, mosquito, and Plasmodium have been completed, but no malaria vaccine is available as yet.

Abstract

Malaria is a protozoan (Plasmodium) infection transmitted by the biting female Anopheles mosquito. The disease affects approximately 40% of the world's population, and an estimated 50 to 70 million Western travelers are exposed to malaria infection annually. Malaria and travelers are inextricably linked since the dawn of time. Malaria owes its distribution worldwide to human travelers, and travelers are linked with the discovery, refinement, and development of several antimalarial drugs. In the year 2003 the genomes for humans, mosquito, and Plasmodium have been completed, but no malaria vaccine is available as yet.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2004
Deposited On:30 Mar 2009 09:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:10
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0891-5520
Additional Information:Issue title: Historical Aspects of Infectious Diseases, Part II
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.idc.2004.01.002
PubMed ID:15145375

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