Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Obstacle stepping in patients with Parkinson's disease: complexity does influence performance


Michel, J; Benninger, D; Dietz, V; van Hedel, H J A (2009). Obstacle stepping in patients with Parkinson's disease: complexity does influence performance. Journal of Neurology, 256(3):457-463.

Abstract

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have difficulties in performing complex bimanual movements. Here we have examined acquisition and performance of a bilateral obstacle stepping task to see whether these difficulties are also present during bipedal movements. Subjects had to minimize foot clearance when repeatedly stepping on a treadmill over randomly approaching obstacles on either side. The subjects had full vision and received acoustic feedback information about task performance. Foot clearance improved in healthy and PD subjects during the acquisition of the task. However, PD subjects showed a slower improvement and achieved a poorer performance level. Thus, in contrast to unilateral obstacle stepping, where no deficits in performance after task repetition were found in PD subjects, bilateral obstacle stepping was poorer in these subjects compared to healthy subjects. The present results extend findings from upper to lower limb movements, namely that PD subjects have difficulties in the performance of bilateral motor tasks.

Abstract

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have difficulties in performing complex bimanual movements. Here we have examined acquisition and performance of a bilateral obstacle stepping task to see whether these difficulties are also present during bipedal movements. Subjects had to minimize foot clearance when repeatedly stepping on a treadmill over randomly approaching obstacles on either side. The subjects had full vision and received acoustic feedback information about task performance. Foot clearance improved in healthy and PD subjects during the acquisition of the task. However, PD subjects showed a slower improvement and achieved a poorer performance level. Thus, in contrast to unilateral obstacle stepping, where no deficits in performance after task repetition were found in PD subjects, bilateral obstacle stepping was poorer in these subjects compared to healthy subjects. The present results extend findings from upper to lower limb movements, namely that PD subjects have difficulties in the performance of bilateral motor tasks.

Statistics

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 19 Mar 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2009
Deposited On:19 Mar 2009 13:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:10
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-5354
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-009-0114-0
PubMed ID:19266148

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher