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Guodunites, a low-palaeolatitude and trans-panthalassic Smithian (Early Triassic) ammonoid genus


Brayard, A; Brühwiler, T; Bucher, H; Jenks, J (2009). Guodunites, a low-palaeolatitude and trans-panthalassic Smithian (Early Triassic) ammonoid genus. Palaeontology, 52(2):471-481.

Abstract

Based on new, bed-rock controlled material from Oman and Utah, USA, the Early Triassic genus Guodunites, which was recently erected on the basis of scarce specimens from northwestern Guangxi, South China, is now shown to be a representative of Proptychitidae. This solves the question
of the previously unknown phylogenetic affinity of this
genus. The genus is restricted to the late middle Smithian,
and to date, its biogeographical distribution comprises
Oman, South China and Utah, thus indicating an essentially
low palaeolatitudinal distribution during the Early Triassic.
Its palaeobiogeographical distribution further strengthens the existence of significant equatorial faunal exchanges between both sides of the Panthalassa at that time. It also suggests that, in addition to the potential stepping stones represented by Panthalassic terranes, vigorous equatorial oceanic currents must have contributed largely to the dispersal of ammonoids during such time intervals.

Abstract

Based on new, bed-rock controlled material from Oman and Utah, USA, the Early Triassic genus Guodunites, which was recently erected on the basis of scarce specimens from northwestern Guangxi, South China, is now shown to be a representative of Proptychitidae. This solves the question
of the previously unknown phylogenetic affinity of this
genus. The genus is restricted to the late middle Smithian,
and to date, its biogeographical distribution comprises
Oman, South China and Utah, thus indicating an essentially
low palaeolatitudinal distribution during the Early Triassic.
Its palaeobiogeographical distribution further strengthens the existence of significant equatorial faunal exchanges between both sides of the Panthalassa at that time. It also suggests that, in addition to the potential stepping stones represented by Panthalassic terranes, vigorous equatorial oceanic currents must have contributed largely to the dispersal of ammonoids during such time intervals.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ceratitida • oceanic currents • Oman • Proptychitidae • Smithian (Early Triassic) • South China • Utah
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:18 Mar 2009 13:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:11
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0031-0239
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-4983.2009.00855.x

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