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Cross-sectional study of weight gain and increase in BMI throughout pregnancy


Ochsenbein-Kölble, Nicole; Roos, Malgorzata; Gasser, Theo; Zimmermann, Roland (2007). Cross-sectional study of weight gain and increase in BMI throughout pregnancy. European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 130(2):180-186.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To generate reliable new reference ranges for weight gain and increase in body mass index (BMI) during pregnancy from a large population. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective cross-sectional study at the Obstetric outpatient clinic, Zurich University Hospital, weight gain and BMI, before gestation and at the booking visit, were determined in 4034 pregnant women with accurately dateable singleton pregnancies (Caucasian: N = 3242, Asian (predominantly from Sri Lanka, Thailand and the Philippines): N = 578 and Black: N = 214). Women with known insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus before pregnancy were excluded. Fifth, 50th and 95th centiles were presented for Caucasians and corresponding centile curves for Asians and Blacks. Simple and multiple regression analyses were performed for various risk factors. A significance level of P < 0.05 was used in all tests. RESULTS: Mean weight gain was 15.5+/-5.9 kg (34.2+/-13.0 lb) at term with values >25.4 kg (56.0 lb) and <5.7 kg (12.6 lb) for the 95th and the 5th centile, respectively. Mean BMI increased slightly and steadily to 28 kgm(-2) at term. Parity and pre-pregnancy BMI were significant determinants in Caucasians. Weight gain and BMI was slightly lower in Asians and Blacks. CONCLUSIONS: BMI centile curves have the advantage in that they consider height during the whole course of pregnancy. It may be an additional helpful tool in controlling weight gain in pregnancy. Further studies are required to determine the prognostic implications of values > or = 95th centile and < or = 5th centile.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To generate reliable new reference ranges for weight gain and increase in body mass index (BMI) during pregnancy from a large population. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective cross-sectional study at the Obstetric outpatient clinic, Zurich University Hospital, weight gain and BMI, before gestation and at the booking visit, were determined in 4034 pregnant women with accurately dateable singleton pregnancies (Caucasian: N = 3242, Asian (predominantly from Sri Lanka, Thailand and the Philippines): N = 578 and Black: N = 214). Women with known insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus before pregnancy were excluded. Fifth, 50th and 95th centiles were presented for Caucasians and corresponding centile curves for Asians and Blacks. Simple and multiple regression analyses were performed for various risk factors. A significance level of P < 0.05 was used in all tests. RESULTS: Mean weight gain was 15.5+/-5.9 kg (34.2+/-13.0 lb) at term with values >25.4 kg (56.0 lb) and <5.7 kg (12.6 lb) for the 95th and the 5th centile, respectively. Mean BMI increased slightly and steadily to 28 kgm(-2) at term. Parity and pre-pregnancy BMI were significant determinants in Caucasians. Weight gain and BMI was slightly lower in Asians and Blacks. CONCLUSIONS: BMI centile curves have the advantage in that they consider height during the whole course of pregnancy. It may be an additional helpful tool in controlling weight gain in pregnancy. Further studies are required to determine the prognostic implications of values > or = 95th centile and < or = 5th centile.

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28 citations in Web of Science®
38 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:30 Mar 2009 08:40
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 19:19
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0301-2115
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2006.03.024
PubMed ID:16698166

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