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Hepatitis C virus and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Findings from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study


Franceschi, S; Polesel, J; Rickenbach, M; Dal Maso, L; Probst-Hensch, N M; Fux, C; Cavassini, M; Hasse, B; Kofler, A; Ledergerber, B; Erb, P; Clifford, G M (2006). Hepatitis C virus and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Findings from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. British Journal of Cancer, 95(11):1598-1602.

Abstract

Infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and, possibly, hepatitis B virus (HBV) are associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in the general population, but little information is available on the relationship between hepatitis viruses and NHL among people with HIV (PHIV). We conducted a matched case-control study nested in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS). Two hundred and ninety-eight NHL cases and 889 control subjects were matched by SHCS centre, gender, age group, CD4+ count at enrollment, and length of follow-up. Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using logistic regression to evaluate the association between NHL and seropositivity for antibodies against HCV (anti-HCV) and hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Anti-HCV was not associated with increased NHL risk overall (OR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.63-1.75), or in different strata of CD4+ count, age or gender. Only among men having sex with men was an association with anti-HCV found (OR = 2.37; 95% CI: 1.03-5.43). No relationships between NHL risk and anti-HBc or HBsAg emerged. Coinfection with HIV and HCV or HBV did not increase NHL risk compared to HIV alone in the SHCS.

Abstract

Infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and, possibly, hepatitis B virus (HBV) are associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in the general population, but little information is available on the relationship between hepatitis viruses and NHL among people with HIV (PHIV). We conducted a matched case-control study nested in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS). Two hundred and ninety-eight NHL cases and 889 control subjects were matched by SHCS centre, gender, age group, CD4+ count at enrollment, and length of follow-up. Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using logistic regression to evaluate the association between NHL and seropositivity for antibodies against HCV (anti-HCV) and hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Anti-HCV was not associated with increased NHL risk overall (OR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.63-1.75), or in different strata of CD4+ count, age or gender. Only among men having sex with men was an association with anti-HCV found (OR = 2.37; 95% CI: 1.03-5.43). No relationships between NHL risk and anti-HBc or HBsAg emerged. Coinfection with HIV and HCV or HBV did not increase NHL risk compared to HIV alone in the SHCS.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:14 November 2006
Deposited On:13 May 2009 13:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0007-0920
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6603472
Official URL:http://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/v95/n11/full/6603472a.html
PubMed ID:17106439

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