Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Correction of muscle artefacts in the EEG power spectrum


Gasser, T; Schuller, J C; Gasser Schreiter, U (2005). Correction of muscle artefacts in the EEG power spectrum. Clinical Neurophysiology, 116(9):2044-2050.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To provide a method for correcting muscle artefacts in fast band power at EEG derivations. METHODS: We define an indicator of surface EMG as power in the band 51.0-69.0 Hz ('muscle power'). This indicator is used to approximately eliminate the contribution of muscle activity on fast band power via a regression model. RESULTS: (1) Patients show a larger proportion of muscle activity in fast band power. (2) There is a clear topographic pattern, frontal-temporal derivations being most susceptible to EMG artefacts. (3) The contribution of surface EMG can be drastically reduced by the proposed correction method. (4) Without correction, results for fast bands can be biased when e.g. comparing control and patient groups and the proposed correction method by and large eliminates this bias. CONCLUSIONS: It is advisable to correct the quantitative EEG reflecting fast activity for the extent of EMG artefacts. SIGNIFICANCE: To render the quantitative EEG more valid as an indicator of cerebral activity.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To provide a method for correcting muscle artefacts in fast band power at EEG derivations. METHODS: We define an indicator of surface EMG as power in the band 51.0-69.0 Hz ('muscle power'). This indicator is used to approximately eliminate the contribution of muscle activity on fast band power via a regression model. RESULTS: (1) Patients show a larger proportion of muscle activity in fast band power. (2) There is a clear topographic pattern, frontal-temporal derivations being most susceptible to EMG artefacts. (3) The contribution of surface EMG can be drastically reduced by the proposed correction method. (4) Without correction, results for fast bands can be biased when e.g. comparing control and patient groups and the proposed correction method by and large eliminates this bias. CONCLUSIONS: It is advisable to correct the quantitative EEG reflecting fast activity for the extent of EMG artefacts. SIGNIFICANCE: To render the quantitative EEG more valid as an indicator of cerebral activity.

Statistics

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 03 Jun 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2005
Deposited On:03 Jun 2009 11:34
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 19:43
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2005.06.002
PubMed ID:16043401

Download