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Causes of mortality in captive Speke's gazelle (Gazella spekei) at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP) Qatar. From 2001 - 2007


Schenk, F; Deb, A; Arif, A; Taha, A; Hammer, S (2009). Causes of mortality in captive Speke's gazelle (Gazella spekei) at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP) Qatar. From 2001 - 2007. In: Wibbelt, G; Kretzschmar, P; Hofer, H. Proceedings of the International Conference on Diseases of Zoo and Wild Animals. Berlin: Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, 325-331.

Abstract

Since 1999, a population of Speke’s gazelles (Gazella spekei) has been managed at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP) in Doha, State of Qatar. As the population at AWWP seems to have suffered unprecedented declines, as compared to other gazelles at AWWP, over the last few years, it was decided to retrospectively evaluate all 206 necropsy reports recorded between 2001 and 2007 to investigate the reasons behind the observed mortality. Postmortem findings
indicating lung infections accounted for almost 30 % of all deaths, followed by traumatic injuries (17.9 %) and maternal neglect leading to starvation and death in neonatal animals (13.5 %).
Animals between 10 days and 1 year of age showed a higher tendency toward problems with lung infections, whereas animals between 2 and 3 years of age died more often because of traumatic injuries. Individuals older than 3 years of age often suffer from lung infection but usually
in combination with other illnesses, such as renal and gastrointestinal diseases.

Abstract

Since 1999, a population of Speke’s gazelles (Gazella spekei) has been managed at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation (AWWP) in Doha, State of Qatar. As the population at AWWP seems to have suffered unprecedented declines, as compared to other gazelles at AWWP, over the last few years, it was decided to retrospectively evaluate all 206 necropsy reports recorded between 2001 and 2007 to investigate the reasons behind the observed mortality. Postmortem findings
indicating lung infections accounted for almost 30 % of all deaths, followed by traumatic injuries (17.9 %) and maternal neglect leading to starvation and death in neonatal animals (13.5 %).
Animals between 10 days and 1 year of age showed a higher tendency toward problems with lung infections, whereas animals between 2 and 3 years of age died more often because of traumatic injuries. Individuals older than 3 years of age often suffer from lung infection but usually
in combination with other illnesses, such as renal and gastrointestinal diseases.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:24 Jun 2009 11:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:14
Publisher:Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research
Official URL:http://www.zoovet-conference.org/

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