Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Cross sectional study of automated blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy


Ochsenbein-Kölble, Nicole; Roos, Malgorzata; Gasser, T; Huch, R; Huch, A; Zimmermann, Roland (2004). Cross sectional study of automated blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 111(4):319-325.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To generate reliable new reference ranges for pregnancy blood pressure from a large population. DESIGN: A prospective cross sectional study. SETTING: Obstetric outpatient clinic, Zurich University Hospital. SAMPLE: Accurately dateable singleton pregnancies (Caucasian: n= 3234; Asian [predominantly from Sri Lanka, Thailand and the Philippines]: n= 577; Black n= 212). METHODS: Between January 1996 and February 2000 blood pressure was determined in 4023 pregnant women using an oscillometric automated device (Dinamap) according to British Hypertension Society recommendations. Women receiving antihypertensive medication were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Blood pressure. RESULTS: Only the means of duplicate measures at the booking visit (5-42 weeks) were used in the analysis. Mean blood pressure decreased from early to mid pregnancy before increasing to levels 4 mmHg higher at term than in early pregnancy. Values >130/80 and <90/50 mmHg were above the 95th and below the 5th centiles, respectively. Parity, age and body mass index were significant determinants in Caucasians. Blood pressure was slightly lower in Asians and Blacks. CONCLUSIONS: The current World Health Organisation definition of high diastolic blood pressure (>or=90 mmHg on two occasions) reflects values >2 standard deviations from the mean. This may be too conservative as threshold for detecting women at risk of pre-eclampsia. Further studies are required to determine the prognostic implications of gestational values >or=95th centile (>or=130/80 mmHg) and <or=5th centile (<or=90/50 mmHg).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To generate reliable new reference ranges for pregnancy blood pressure from a large population. DESIGN: A prospective cross sectional study. SETTING: Obstetric outpatient clinic, Zurich University Hospital. SAMPLE: Accurately dateable singleton pregnancies (Caucasian: n= 3234; Asian [predominantly from Sri Lanka, Thailand and the Philippines]: n= 577; Black n= 212). METHODS: Between January 1996 and February 2000 blood pressure was determined in 4023 pregnant women using an oscillometric automated device (Dinamap) according to British Hypertension Society recommendations. Women receiving antihypertensive medication were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Blood pressure. RESULTS: Only the means of duplicate measures at the booking visit (5-42 weeks) were used in the analysis. Mean blood pressure decreased from early to mid pregnancy before increasing to levels 4 mmHg higher at term than in early pregnancy. Values >130/80 and <90/50 mmHg were above the 95th and below the 5th centiles, respectively. Parity, age and body mass index were significant determinants in Caucasians. Blood pressure was slightly lower in Asians and Blacks. CONCLUSIONS: The current World Health Organisation definition of high diastolic blood pressure (>or=90 mmHg on two occasions) reflects values >2 standard deviations from the mean. This may be too conservative as threshold for detecting women at risk of pre-eclampsia. Further studies are required to determine the prognostic implications of gestational values >or=95th centile (>or=130/80 mmHg) and <or=5th centile (<or=90/50 mmHg).

Statistics

Citations

20 citations in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 23 Jun 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:23 Jun 2009 12:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:16
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1470-0328
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2004.00099.x
Official URL:http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118813569/abstract
PubMed ID:15008766

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher