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No ‘bypass’ in adult ruminants: Passage of fluid ingested vs. fluid inserted into the rumen in fistulated muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and moose (Alces alces)


Lechner, I; Barboza, P; Collins, W; Günther, D; Hattendorf, B; Hummel, J; Clauss, Marcus (2009). No ‘bypass’ in adult ruminants: Passage of fluid ingested vs. fluid inserted into the rumen in fistulated muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and moose (Alces alces). Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 154(1):151-156.

Abstract

In young ruminants, the reticular groove ensures that ingested milk is channelled past the forestomach to avoid malfermentation. It has been speculated that some adult wild ruminants, in particular browsing species, maintain a functional oesophageal (reticular) groove, that soluble nutrients can thus bypass the rumen, and that thus the energetic gain from the diet can be increased. We inserted a fluid marker (Co-EDTA) via cannula into the rumen and simultaneously fed a diet that contained a second fluid marker (Sm-EDTA), and analysed the faecal marker excretion patterns, in muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus, n=4 in two experiments each), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus, n=4 in a total of six experiments) and moose (Alces alces, n=1 in one experiment). In no case was the orally fed marker excreted dinstinctively earlier than the marker inserted into the rumen, which indicates that substantial bypass did not occur in these animals. However, differences between the three species in the excretion of the two markers from the rumen are consistent with hypothetical differences in the stratification of rumen contents. We suggest that effects previously ascribed to a “rumen bypass” in wild ruminants most likely reflect differences in the passage from the rumen.

Abstract

In young ruminants, the reticular groove ensures that ingested milk is channelled past the forestomach to avoid malfermentation. It has been speculated that some adult wild ruminants, in particular browsing species, maintain a functional oesophageal (reticular) groove, that soluble nutrients can thus bypass the rumen, and that thus the energetic gain from the diet can be increased. We inserted a fluid marker (Co-EDTA) via cannula into the rumen and simultaneously fed a diet that contained a second fluid marker (Sm-EDTA), and analysed the faecal marker excretion patterns, in muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus, n=4 in two experiments each), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus, n=4 in a total of six experiments) and moose (Alces alces, n=1 in one experiment). In no case was the orally fed marker excreted dinstinctively earlier than the marker inserted into the rumen, which indicates that substantial bypass did not occur in these animals. However, differences between the three species in the excretion of the two markers from the rumen are consistent with hypothetical differences in the stratification of rumen contents. We suggest that effects previously ascribed to a “rumen bypass” in wild ruminants most likely reflect differences in the passage from the rumen.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Date:September 2009
Deposited On:10 Jul 2009 14:50
Last Modified:05 Oct 2016 07:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1095-6433
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2009.05.122

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