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Small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are predictors of cardio- and cerebro-vascular events in subjects with the metabolic syndrome


Rizzo, M; Pernice, V; Frasheri, A; Di Lorenzo, G; Rini, G B; Spinas, G A; Berneis, K (2009). Small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are predictors of cardio- and cerebro-vascular events in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. Clinical Endocrinology, 70(6):870-875.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are a feature of the metabolic syndrome (MS) but their predictive role still remains to be established. We performed a 2-year follow-up study in 124 subjects with MS (63 +/- 6 years), as defined by the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute guidelines, to assess clinical and biochemical predictors of cerebro- and cardio-vascular events. METHODS AND RESULTS: Beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors, we measured LDL size and subclasses by gradient gel electrophoresis. Clinical events were registered in the 25% of subjects. At univariate analysis subjects with events had increased prevalence of elevated fasting glucose (P = 0.0117), smoking (P = 0.0015), family history of coronary artery disease (P = 0.0033) and higher levels of total- and LDL-cholesterol (P = 0.0027 and P = 0.0023, respectively); LDL size was lower (P < 0.0001), due to reduced larger subclasses and increased small, dense LDL (all P < 0.0001). At multivariate analysis the following were independent predictors of events (univariate odd ratios were calculated): low HDL-cholesterol (OR 15.4, P = 0.0238), elevated fasting glucose (OR 12.1, P = 0.0102), elevated small, dense LDL (OR 11.7, P = 0.0004), elevated blood pressure (OR 9.2, P = 0.0392), smoking (OR 4.8, P = 0.0054). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that assessed the predictive role of small, dense LDL beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with MS.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are a feature of the metabolic syndrome (MS) but their predictive role still remains to be established. We performed a 2-year follow-up study in 124 subjects with MS (63 +/- 6 years), as defined by the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute guidelines, to assess clinical and biochemical predictors of cerebro- and cardio-vascular events. METHODS AND RESULTS: Beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors, we measured LDL size and subclasses by gradient gel electrophoresis. Clinical events were registered in the 25% of subjects. At univariate analysis subjects with events had increased prevalence of elevated fasting glucose (P = 0.0117), smoking (P = 0.0015), family history of coronary artery disease (P = 0.0033) and higher levels of total- and LDL-cholesterol (P = 0.0027 and P = 0.0023, respectively); LDL size was lower (P < 0.0001), due to reduced larger subclasses and increased small, dense LDL (all P < 0.0001). At multivariate analysis the following were independent predictors of events (univariate odd ratios were calculated): low HDL-cholesterol (OR 15.4, P = 0.0238), elevated fasting glucose (OR 12.1, P = 0.0102), elevated small, dense LDL (OR 11.7, P = 0.0004), elevated blood pressure (OR 9.2, P = 0.0392), smoking (OR 4.8, P = 0.0054). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that assessed the predictive role of small, dense LDL beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with MS.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2009
Deposited On:14 Jul 2009 15:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:17
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0300-0664
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2265.2008.03407.x
PubMed ID:18771560

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