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The Web Experiment Method: Advantages, disadvantages, and solutions


Reips, U D (2000). The Web Experiment Method: Advantages, disadvantages, and solutions. In: Birnbaum, M H. Psychological experiments on the Internet. San Diego, CA: Acadmic Press, 89-118.

Abstract

The World Wide Web (WWW) provides a new tool for experimental research. The Web experiment method differs in fundamental aspects from traditional laboratory and field
experiments; therefore it can be used to validate previous findings. Web experiments offer (1) easy access to a demographically and culturally diverse participant population, including participants from unique and previously inaccessible target populations; (2) bringing the
experiment to the participant instead of the opposite; (3) high statistical power by enabling access to large samples; (4) the direct assessment of motivational confounding; and (5) cost savings of lab space, person-hours, equipment, and administration. These and 13 other advantages of Web experiments are reviewed and contrasted with 7 disadvantages, such as (1) multiple submissions, (2) lack of experimental control, (3) self-selection, and (4) drop out.
Several techniques and other detailed solutions are described that avoid potential problems or
even turn them into useful features of Web experimentation.

Abstract

The World Wide Web (WWW) provides a new tool for experimental research. The Web experiment method differs in fundamental aspects from traditional laboratory and field
experiments; therefore it can be used to validate previous findings. Web experiments offer (1) easy access to a demographically and culturally diverse participant population, including participants from unique and previously inaccessible target populations; (2) bringing the
experiment to the participant instead of the opposite; (3) high statistical power by enabling access to large samples; (4) the direct assessment of motivational confounding; and (5) cost savings of lab space, person-hours, equipment, and administration. These and 13 other advantages of Web experiments are reviewed and contrasted with 7 disadvantages, such as (1) multiple submissions, (2) lack of experimental control, (3) self-selection, and (4) drop out.
Several techniques and other detailed solutions are described that avoid potential problems or
even turn them into useful features of Web experimentation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2000
Deposited On:24 Jul 2009 10:57
Last Modified:14 Sep 2016 13:39
Publisher:Acadmic Press
ISBN:0-12-099980-3
Official URL:http://psych.fullerton.edu/mbirnbaum/web/IntroWeb.htm
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&mode=Advanced&vid=ZAD&vl%28186672378UI0%29=isbn&vl%281UI0%29=contains&vl%28freeText0%29=0-12-099980-3

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