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Quantification of friction force reduction induced by obstetric gels


Riener, R; Leypold, K; Brunschweiler, A; Schaub, A; Bleul, U; Wolf, P (2009). Quantification of friction force reduction induced by obstetric gels. Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, 47(6):617-623.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to quantify the reduction of friction forces by obstetric gels aimed to facilitate human childbirth. Lubricants, two obstetric gels with different viscosities and distilled water, were applied to a porcine model under mechanical conditions comparable to human childbirth. In tests with higher movement speeds of the skin relative to the birth canal, both obstetric gels significantly reduced dynamic friction forces by 30-40% in comparison to distilled water. At the lowest movement speed, only the more viscous gel reduced dynamic friction force significantly. In tests modifying the dwell time before a movement was initiated, static friction forces of trials with highly viscous gel were generally lower than those with distilled water. The performed biomechanical tests support the recommendation of using obstetric gels during human childbirth. Using the presented test apparatus may reduce the amount of clinical testing required to optimize gel formulation.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to quantify the reduction of friction forces by obstetric gels aimed to facilitate human childbirth. Lubricants, two obstetric gels with different viscosities and distilled water, were applied to a porcine model under mechanical conditions comparable to human childbirth. In tests with higher movement speeds of the skin relative to the birth canal, both obstetric gels significantly reduced dynamic friction forces by 30-40% in comparison to distilled water. At the lowest movement speed, only the more viscous gel reduced dynamic friction force significantly. In tests modifying the dwell time before a movement was initiated, static friction forces of trials with highly viscous gel were generally lower than those with distilled water. The performed biomechanical tests support the recommendation of using obstetric gels during human childbirth. Using the presented test apparatus may reduce the amount of clinical testing required to optimize gel formulation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2009
Deposited On:22 Jul 2009 09:19
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 20:12
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0140-0118
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11517-009-0460-1
PubMed ID:19238473

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