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Intramedullary cavernous malformations: clinical features and surgical technique via hemilaminectomy


Bian, L G; Bertalanffy, H; Sun, Q F; Shen, J K (2009). Intramedullary cavernous malformations: clinical features and surgical technique via hemilaminectomy. Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, 111(6):511-517.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to define the clinical features and the surgical technique of unilateral hemilaminectomy for treating intramedullary cavernous malformations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective chart was performed in 16 patients with histologically diagnosed intramedullary cavernous malformations. All patients were treated with unilateral hemilaminectomy and microsurgical resection of the malformations. The pre- and postoperative neurological state was evaluated using Frankel scale. RESULTS: There were nine females and seven males (mean age 38 years) harbouring symptomatic intramedullary cavernous malformations. The annual retrospective haemorrhage rate was 3.1% per patient/year. All cavernous malformations were completely resected. Twelve of 16 patients experienced the improvement of the neurological state and in four patients, clinical features remained unchanged during the follow-up period. Static and dynamic plain radiograph film showed none of them had spinal deformity or spinal instability. CONCLUSION: According to the defined bleeding risk, symptomatic and MRI-morphologically growing intramedullary cavernous malformations should be totally surgically removed, to avoid the recurrence and rebleeding of the residue. A least traumatic myelotomy, as well as a meticulous microsurgical technique and the intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials monitoring, together with selection of a minimally invasive microsurgical approach (hemilaminectomy), leads to a favourable outcome and prevents additional morbidity.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to define the clinical features and the surgical technique of unilateral hemilaminectomy for treating intramedullary cavernous malformations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective chart was performed in 16 patients with histologically diagnosed intramedullary cavernous malformations. All patients were treated with unilateral hemilaminectomy and microsurgical resection of the malformations. The pre- and postoperative neurological state was evaluated using Frankel scale. RESULTS: There were nine females and seven males (mean age 38 years) harbouring symptomatic intramedullary cavernous malformations. The annual retrospective haemorrhage rate was 3.1% per patient/year. All cavernous malformations were completely resected. Twelve of 16 patients experienced the improvement of the neurological state and in four patients, clinical features remained unchanged during the follow-up period. Static and dynamic plain radiograph film showed none of them had spinal deformity or spinal instability. CONCLUSION: According to the defined bleeding risk, symptomatic and MRI-morphologically growing intramedullary cavernous malformations should be totally surgically removed, to avoid the recurrence and rebleeding of the residue. A least traumatic myelotomy, as well as a meticulous microsurgical technique and the intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials monitoring, together with selection of a minimally invasive microsurgical approach (hemilaminectomy), leads to a favourable outcome and prevents additional morbidity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2009
Deposited On:10 Aug 2009 13:01
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 20:18
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0303-8467
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2009.02.003
PubMed ID:19297082

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