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Die sozialräumliche Dynamik der urbanisierten Schweiz und ihre politikgeografische Dimension


Leuthold, H. Die sozialräumliche Dynamik der urbanisierten Schweiz und ihre politikgeografische Dimension. 2006, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science.

Abstract

The caracteristics of urbanisation under postfordist conditions in Switzerland are the emergence of large polycentric metropolitan areas and the overlay of suburbanisation and reurbanisation processes at the same time. This thesis investigates the impact of these urbanisation processes on the population structure and the geography of political behaviour.
The dynamics of the population structure was measuerd with an adapted social area analysis method for the whole country. The expansion of the urban space in Switzerland was followed by the diffusion of urban lifestyles into the suburban and rural areas and the formation of quartered metropolitan areas. While the existing sociospatial structures of the large agglomerations are still dependent of the economic and cultural context, the patterns of ongoing processes of periurbanisation, gentrification and marginalisation are independent of the context. The geography of political behaviour was measured with results of popular referenda. A strong homology between the sociodemographic and political topography could be observed. The parallels between sociodemographic changes and change of political behaviour are obvious. Reurbanisation is mirrored in the appearance of a typicalurban left-liberal mentality. The consequences of gentrification and marginalisation are a political divergence between former working-class areas.
Unlike the processes of socio-spatial change, which are independent of the cultural context the dynamics of the political geography in urban areas differs between Francophone and Swiss German agglomerations.

Abstract

The caracteristics of urbanisation under postfordist conditions in Switzerland are the emergence of large polycentric metropolitan areas and the overlay of suburbanisation and reurbanisation processes at the same time. This thesis investigates the impact of these urbanisation processes on the population structure and the geography of political behaviour.
The dynamics of the population structure was measuerd with an adapted social area analysis method for the whole country. The expansion of the urban space in Switzerland was followed by the diffusion of urban lifestyles into the suburban and rural areas and the formation of quartered metropolitan areas. While the existing sociospatial structures of the large agglomerations are still dependent of the economic and cultural context, the patterns of ongoing processes of periurbanisation, gentrification and marginalisation are independent of the context. The geography of political behaviour was measured with results of popular referenda. A strong homology between the sociodemographic and political topography could be observed. The parallels between sociodemographic changes and change of political behaviour are obvious. Reurbanisation is mirrored in the appearance of a typicalurban left-liberal mentality. The consequences of gentrification and marginalisation are a political divergence between former working-class areas.
Unlike the processes of socio-spatial change, which are independent of the cultural context the dynamics of the political geography in urban areas differs between Francophone and Swiss German agglomerations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Elsasser H, Brassel K, Ladner A
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:German
Date:2006
Deposited On:23 Sep 2009 04:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:20
Number of Pages:350
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005538136

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