Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The functional Val158Met polymorphism of COMT predicts interindividual differences in brain alpha oscillations in young men


Bodenmann, S; Rusterholz, T; Dürr, R; Stoll, C; Bachmann, V; Geissler, E; Jaggi-Schwarz, K; Landolt, H P (2009). The functional Val158Met polymorphism of COMT predicts interindividual differences in brain alpha oscillations in young men. Journal of Neuroscience, 29(35):10855-10862.

Abstract

Individual patterns of the electroencephalogram (EEG) in wakefulness and sleep are among the most heritable traits in humans, yet distinct genetic and neurochemical mechanisms underlying EEG phenotypes are largely unknown. A functional polymorphism in the gene encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme playing an important role in cortical dopamine metabolism, causes a common substitution of methionine (Met) for valine (Val) at codon 158 of COMT protein. Val allele homozygotes exhibit higher COMT activity and lower dopaminergic signaling in prefrontal cortex than Met/Met homozygotes. Evidence suggests that this polymorphism affects executive functions in healthy individuals. We hypothesized that it also modulates functional aspects of EEG in wakefulness and sleep. EEG recordings were conducted twice on separate occasions in 10 Val/Val and 12 Met/Met allele carriers (all men) in wakefulness, and in baseline and recovery sleep before and after 40 h prolonged waking. During sleep deprivation, subjects received placebo and modafinil in randomized, cross-over manner. We show that the Val158Met polymorphism predicts stable and frequency-specific, interindividual variation in brain alpha oscillations. Alpha peak frequency in wakefulness was 1.4 Hz slower in Val/Val genotype than in Met/Met genotype. Moreover, Val/Val allele carriers exhibited less 11-13 Hz activity than Met/Met homozygotes in wakefulness, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM sleep. This difference was resistant against the effects of sleep deprivation and modafinil. The data demonstrate that mechanisms involving COMT contribute to interindividual differences in brain alpha oscillations, which are functionally related to executive performance such as counting tendency on a random number generation task in young adults.

Abstract

Individual patterns of the electroencephalogram (EEG) in wakefulness and sleep are among the most heritable traits in humans, yet distinct genetic and neurochemical mechanisms underlying EEG phenotypes are largely unknown. A functional polymorphism in the gene encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme playing an important role in cortical dopamine metabolism, causes a common substitution of methionine (Met) for valine (Val) at codon 158 of COMT protein. Val allele homozygotes exhibit higher COMT activity and lower dopaminergic signaling in prefrontal cortex than Met/Met homozygotes. Evidence suggests that this polymorphism affects executive functions in healthy individuals. We hypothesized that it also modulates functional aspects of EEG in wakefulness and sleep. EEG recordings were conducted twice on separate occasions in 10 Val/Val and 12 Met/Met allele carriers (all men) in wakefulness, and in baseline and recovery sleep before and after 40 h prolonged waking. During sleep deprivation, subjects received placebo and modafinil in randomized, cross-over manner. We show that the Val158Met polymorphism predicts stable and frequency-specific, interindividual variation in brain alpha oscillations. Alpha peak frequency in wakefulness was 1.4 Hz slower in Val/Val genotype than in Met/Met genotype. Moreover, Val/Val allele carriers exhibited less 11-13 Hz activity than Met/Met homozygotes in wakefulness, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM sleep. This difference was resistant against the effects of sleep deprivation and modafinil. The data demonstrate that mechanisms involving COMT contribute to interindividual differences in brain alpha oscillations, which are functionally related to executive performance such as counting tendency on a random number generation task in young adults.

Statistics

Citations

41 citations in Web of Science®
54 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

162 downloads since deposited on 23 Sep 2009
16 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2 September 2009
Deposited On:23 Sep 2009 13:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:20
Publisher:Society for Neuroscience
ISSN:0270-6474
Additional Information:Holder of copyright: The Society for Neuroscience
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1427-09.2009
PubMed ID:19726643

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 168kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations