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Dating charred soil organic matter - comparison of radiocarbon ages from macrocharcoals and chemically separated charcoal carbon


Eckmeier, E; van der Borg, K; Tegtmeier, U; Schmidt, M W I; Gerlach, R (2009). Dating charred soil organic matter - comparison of radiocarbon ages from macrocharcoals and chemically separated charcoal carbon. Radiocarbon, 51(2):437 -443.

Abstract

Radiocarbon dating of charcoal in soils is commonly used to reconstruct past environmental processes. Also microcharcoal that is chemically isolated from soil organic matter by high-energy UV photo-oxidation can be dated with 14C accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We compared the 14C AMS ages of 13 pairs of hand-picked macrocharcoals and
microcharcoal samples separated via the UV oxidation method; both charcoal fractions were taken from the same soil samples (prehistoric pit fillings). We found that in most cases, the microcharcoal fraction yielded older ages than the single macrocharcoal pieces, and that the differences between the ages are not systematic. A reason for these age differences might be that the microcharcoal fraction consists of more stable components than macrocharcoals and thus yields older ages. Dating of
microcharcoal would give a mean age of charred organic matter in soil material and the ages of the more stable compounds.
Thus, 14C data obtained from the microcharcoal fraction in soils is not comparable to macrocharcoal ages and should not be used to complement existing macrocharcoal data sets.

Abstract

Radiocarbon dating of charcoal in soils is commonly used to reconstruct past environmental processes. Also microcharcoal that is chemically isolated from soil organic matter by high-energy UV photo-oxidation can be dated with 14C accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We compared the 14C AMS ages of 13 pairs of hand-picked macrocharcoals and
microcharcoal samples separated via the UV oxidation method; both charcoal fractions were taken from the same soil samples (prehistoric pit fillings). We found that in most cases, the microcharcoal fraction yielded older ages than the single macrocharcoal pieces, and that the differences between the ages are not systematic. A reason for these age differences might be that the microcharcoal fraction consists of more stable components than macrocharcoals and thus yields older ages. Dating of
microcharcoal would give a mean age of charred organic matter in soil material and the ages of the more stable compounds.
Thus, 14C data obtained from the microcharcoal fraction in soils is not comparable to macrocharcoal ages and should not be used to complement existing macrocharcoal data sets.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:25 Sep 2009 12:07
Last Modified:29 Jan 2017 06:36
Publisher:Dept. of Geosciences, University of Arizona
ISSN:0033-8222
Additional Information:Proceedings of the 5th International 14C and Archaeology Symposium, 26-28th March 2008, Zurich, Switzerland
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033822200055831
Official URL:https://www.uair.arizona.edu/holdings/journal/issue?r=http://radiocarbon.library.arizona.edu/Volume51/Number2/

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