Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Symbiosis between grasses and asexual fungal endophytes.


Müller, C B; Krauss, J (2005). Symbiosis between grasses and asexual fungal endophytes. Current Opinion in Plant Biology, 8(4):450-456.

Abstract

The symbiosis between vertically transmitted asexual endophytic fungi and grasses is common and generally considered to be mutualistic. Recent studies have accumulated evidence of negative effects of endophytes on plant fitness, prompting a debate on the true nature of the symbiosis. Genetic factors in each of the two partners show high variability and have a range of effects (from positive to negative) on plant fitness. In addition, interacting environmental factors might modify the nature of the symbiosis. Finally, competition and multitrophic interactions among grass consumers are influenced by endophytes, and the effects of plant neighbours or consumers could feedback to affect plant fitness. We propose a mutualism-parasitism continuum for the symbiosis between asexual endophytes and grasses, which is similar to the associations between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.

Abstract

The symbiosis between vertically transmitted asexual endophytic fungi and grasses is common and generally considered to be mutualistic. Recent studies have accumulated evidence of negative effects of endophytes on plant fitness, prompting a debate on the true nature of the symbiosis. Genetic factors in each of the two partners show high variability and have a range of effects (from positive to negative) on plant fitness. In addition, interacting environmental factors might modify the nature of the symbiosis. Finally, competition and multitrophic interactions among grass consumers are influenced by endophytes, and the effects of plant neighbours or consumers could feedback to affect plant fitness. We propose a mutualism-parasitism continuum for the symbiosis between asexual endophytes and grasses, which is similar to the associations between plants and mycorrhizal fungi.

Statistics

Citations

113 citations in Web of Science®
125 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Lolium perenne, ryegrass, host genotype, Neotyphodium endophytes, entomopathogenic nematode, drought stress
Language:English
Date:1 August 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1369-5266
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbi.2005.05.007
PubMed ID:15946893

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher