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HIV-specific cellular immune response is inversely correlated with disease progression as defined by decline of CD4+ T cells in relation to HIV RNA load.


Oxenius, A; Price, D A; Hersberger, M; Schlaepfer, E; Weber, R; Weber, M; Kundig, T M; Böni, J; Joller, H; Phillips, R E; Flepp, M; Opravil, M; Speck, R F (2004). HIV-specific cellular immune response is inversely correlated with disease progression as defined by decline of CD4+ T cells in relation to HIV RNA load. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 189(7):1199-1208.

Abstract

The average time between infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome is approximately 8 years. However, progression rates vary widely, depending on several determinants, including HIV-specific immunity, host genetic factors, and virulence of the infecting strain. In untreated HIV-infected patients with different progression rates, we examined HIV-specific T cell responses in combination with host genetic markers, such as chemokine/chemokine-receptor (CCR) polymorphisms and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes. HIV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses and, to a lesser extent, HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were inversely correlated with progression rate. Slower progression was not related to polymorphisms in CCR genes, HLA genotype, or GB virus C coinfection. These data suggest that HIV-specific T cell responses are involved in protecting the host from disease progression.

Abstract

The average time between infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome is approximately 8 years. However, progression rates vary widely, depending on several determinants, including HIV-specific immunity, host genetic factors, and virulence of the infecting strain. In untreated HIV-infected patients with different progression rates, we examined HIV-specific T cell responses in combination with host genetic markers, such as chemokine/chemokine-receptor (CCR) polymorphisms and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes. HIV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses and, to a lesser extent, HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were inversely correlated with progression rate. Slower progression was not related to polymorphisms in CCR genes, HLA genotype, or GB virus C coinfection. These data suggest that HIV-specific T cell responses are involved in protecting the host from disease progression.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 April 2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:22
Publisher:University of Chicago Press
ISSN:0022-1899
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/382028
PubMed ID:15031788

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