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Fungal endosymbionts affect aphid population size by reduction of adult life span and fecundity


Meister, B; Krauss, J; Härri, S A; Schneider, M V; Müller, C B (2006). Fungal endosymbionts affect aphid population size by reduction of adult life span and fecundity. Basic and Applied Ecology, 7(3):244-252.

Abstract

The symbiosis between grasses and endophytic fungi is a common phenomenon and can affect herbivore performance through acquired, chemical plant defence by fungal alkaloids. In laboratory experiments, two species of common grass aphids, Rhopalosiphum padi and Metopolophium dirhodum were tested, in a population experiment (on four plant cultivars) and individually (on one plant cultivar) for the
effects of the endophyte, Neotyphodium lolii, that forms symbiotic associations with perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne. In the population experiment that lasted for four
aphid generations both aphid species showed decreased population sizes when feeding on each of the four endophyte-infected cultivars. Individuals of R. padi
tested individually showed reduced adult life span and fecundity when feeding on infected plants. Individuals of M. dirhodum showed no response in any of the traits measured. This suggests that R. padi individuals are more sensitive to endophyte infection than M. dirhodum individuals. However, all infected grass cultivars reduced population sizes of both aphid species over four generations. Therefore, fungal
endophytes can reduce populations of aphid herbivores independent of plant cultivars.

Abstract

The symbiosis between grasses and endophytic fungi is a common phenomenon and can affect herbivore performance through acquired, chemical plant defence by fungal alkaloids. In laboratory experiments, two species of common grass aphids, Rhopalosiphum padi and Metopolophium dirhodum were tested, in a population experiment (on four plant cultivars) and individually (on one plant cultivar) for the
effects of the endophyte, Neotyphodium lolii, that forms symbiotic associations with perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne. In the population experiment that lasted for four
aphid generations both aphid species showed decreased population sizes when feeding on each of the four endophyte-infected cultivars. Individuals of R. padi
tested individually showed reduced adult life span and fecundity when feeding on infected plants. Individuals of M. dirhodum showed no response in any of the traits measured. This suggests that R. padi individuals are more sensitive to endophyte infection than M. dirhodum individuals. However, all infected grass cultivars reduced population sizes of both aphid species over four generations. Therefore, fungal
endophytes can reduce populations of aphid herbivores independent of plant cultivars.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2 May 2006
Deposited On:26 Feb 2008 15:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:22
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1439-1791
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2005.06.002

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