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Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty


Gerber, C; Pennington, S D; Nyffeler, R W (2009). Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 17(5):284-295.

Abstract

The radical changes in prosthetic design made in the mid 1980s transformed the historically poorly performing reverse ball-and-socket total shoulder prosthesis into a highly successful salvage implant for pseudoparalytic, severely rotator cuff-deficient shoulders. Moving the center of rotation more medial and distal as well as implanting a large glenoid hemisphere that articulates with a humeral cup in 155 degrees of valgus are the biomechanical keys to sometimes spectacular short- to mid-term results. Use of the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty device allows salvage of injuries that previously were beyond surgical treatment. However, this technique has a complication rate approximately three times that of conventional arthroplasty. Radiographic and clinical results appear to deteriorate over time. Proper patient selection and attention to technical details are needed to reduce the currently high complication rate.

Abstract

The radical changes in prosthetic design made in the mid 1980s transformed the historically poorly performing reverse ball-and-socket total shoulder prosthesis into a highly successful salvage implant for pseudoparalytic, severely rotator cuff-deficient shoulders. Moving the center of rotation more medial and distal as well as implanting a large glenoid hemisphere that articulates with a humeral cup in 155 degrees of valgus are the biomechanical keys to sometimes spectacular short- to mid-term results. Use of the reverse total shoulder arthroplasty device allows salvage of injuries that previously were beyond surgical treatment. However, this technique has a complication rate approximately three times that of conventional arthroplasty. Radiographic and clinical results appear to deteriorate over time. Proper patient selection and attention to technical details are needed to reduce the currently high complication rate.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:19 Oct 2009 09:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:30
Publisher:American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
ISSN:1067-151X
Official URL:http://www.jaaos.org/cgi/content/full/17/5/284
PubMed ID:19411640

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