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Homocysteine metabolism and CSF markers for Alzheimer's disease


Popp, J; Lewczuk, P; Linnebank, M; Cvetanovska, G; Smulders, Y; Kölsch, H; Frommann, I; Kornhuber, J; Maier, W; Jessen, F (2009). Homocysteine metabolism and CSF markers for Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 5(4 / Su):500.

Abstract

Disturbed homocysteine metabolism is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may contribute to the disease pathophysiology by increasing both amyloid-beta (Abeta) production and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) accumulation. Here, we evaluated the relationship between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), and the markers for AD pathology, amyloid-beta (Abeta)<formula>_{1-42}</formula> and P-tau181, in 98 cognitively healthy subjects aged 16-81 years and 54 AD patients. In multivariate regression tests including age, gender, creatinine, and presence of the apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele, P-tau181 was associated with SAH (beta = 0.490; p < 0.001), 5-MTHF (beta = -0.273; p = 0.010) levels, and SAM/SAH ratio (beta = -0.319; p = 0.013) in controls, and with SAH (beta = 0.529; p = 0.001) in AD patients. The levels of Abeta<formula>_{1-42}</formula> were not associated with the CSF concentrations of Hcys, SAM, SAH, or 5-MTHF neither in the AD nor in the control group. The results suggest that alteration of the homocysteine metabolism is related to increased accumulation of phosphorylated tau and may contribute to the neurofibrillary pathology in normal aging and in AD.

Abstract

Disturbed homocysteine metabolism is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may contribute to the disease pathophysiology by increasing both amyloid-beta (Abeta) production and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) accumulation. Here, we evaluated the relationship between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), and the markers for AD pathology, amyloid-beta (Abeta)<formula>_{1-42}</formula> and P-tau181, in 98 cognitively healthy subjects aged 16-81 years and 54 AD patients. In multivariate regression tests including age, gender, creatinine, and presence of the apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele, P-tau181 was associated with SAH (beta = 0.490; p < 0.001), 5-MTHF (beta = -0.273; p = 0.010) levels, and SAM/SAH ratio (beta = -0.319; p = 0.013) in controls, and with SAH (beta = 0.529; p = 0.001) in AD patients. The levels of Abeta<formula>_{1-42}</formula> were not associated with the CSF concentrations of Hcys, SAM, SAH, or 5-MTHF neither in the AD nor in the control group. The results suggest that alteration of the homocysteine metabolism is related to increased accumulation of phosphorylated tau and may contribute to the neurofibrillary pathology in normal aging and in AD.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:02 Nov 2009 13:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:31
Publisher:IOS Press
ISSN:1387-2877
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2009.04.706
PubMed ID:19661622

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