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Coat condition, housing condition and measurement of faecal cortisol metabolites - a non-invasive study about alopecia in captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)


Steinmetz, H W; Kaumanns, W; Dix, I; Heistermann, M; Fox, M; Kaup, F J (2006). Coat condition, housing condition and measurement of faecal cortisol metabolites - a non-invasive study about alopecia in captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Journal of Medical Primatology, 35(1):3-11.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have characterized alopecia in captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by a mixed partial to complete alopecia in a bilateral symmetric pattern. METHODS: In this study, coat condition assessments were related to exogenous and endogenous factors in captive rhesus macaques under different housing conditions in order to identify disturbances in environmental factors controlling or influencing hair growth. Additionally, the degree of alopecia was investigated in relation to adrenal endocrine function as an indicator of social stress using faecal glucocorticoid measurements. RESULTS: Hair loss was found to vary with season and sex, was most pronounced in adult females during the winter and spring months. Generally, infants were not affected, but alopecia developed during adolescence. However, the housing system, available enclosure space and variations in group size and composition also appeared to influence coat condition. Levels of immunoreactive cortisol metabolites (11-oxoetiocholanolone) in faeces were significantly negatively correlated with alopecia, suggesting a relationship between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and hair loss in captive rhesus macaques. CONCLUSIONS: Although the present study demonstrates the influence of the HPA axis on coat condition, it is not known if hair loss is caused by abnormal behaviour or hormonal imbalances of the HPA axis itself. Our data suggest that alopecia in rhesus macaques is a highly complex multicausal disorder.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have characterized alopecia in captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by a mixed partial to complete alopecia in a bilateral symmetric pattern. METHODS: In this study, coat condition assessments were related to exogenous and endogenous factors in captive rhesus macaques under different housing conditions in order to identify disturbances in environmental factors controlling or influencing hair growth. Additionally, the degree of alopecia was investigated in relation to adrenal endocrine function as an indicator of social stress using faecal glucocorticoid measurements. RESULTS: Hair loss was found to vary with season and sex, was most pronounced in adult females during the winter and spring months. Generally, infants were not affected, but alopecia developed during adolescence. However, the housing system, available enclosure space and variations in group size and composition also appeared to influence coat condition. Levels of immunoreactive cortisol metabolites (11-oxoetiocholanolone) in faeces were significantly negatively correlated with alopecia, suggesting a relationship between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and hair loss in captive rhesus macaques. CONCLUSIONS: Although the present study demonstrates the influence of the HPA axis on coat condition, it is not known if hair loss is caused by abnormal behaviour or hormonal imbalances of the HPA axis itself. Our data suggest that alopecia in rhesus macaques is a highly complex multicausal disorder.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:29 Apr 2008 12:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:22
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0047-2565
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0684.2005.00141.x
PubMed ID:16430489

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