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Application of relative and absolute dating techniques in the Alpine environment


Favilli, F; Egli, M; Sartori, G; Cherubini, P; Brandova, D (2009). Application of relative and absolute dating techniques in the Alpine environment. Studi Trentini di Scienze Naturali, 85:93-108.

Abstract

Application of relative and absolute dating techniques in the Alpine environment - The Late Pleistocene and Early
Holocene climate oscillation and the Alpine landscape evolution of Val di Rabbi (Trentino, Italy) were reconstructed using a combined
methodology of relative and absolute dating techniques. The research was carried out in the following four steps: 1) an earlier study
examined the investigated area (aerial photos, soil mapping etc.) to detect and sample the most representative sites (soils and boulders);
2) the extraction of the oldest organic matter fraction from the soil profiles followed by radiocarbon dating; 3) the comparison of the
14C dating results with the 10Be age sequence from representative boulders; 4) the addition of relative dating techniques to the absolute
ones to detect signals of Alpine landscape evolution. We found close links among the results obtained from the relative dating and the
absolute ones, showing the dynamics of an Alpine landscape within a relatively small area. The combination of relative and absolute
dating techniques is a promising tool for the reconstruction of landscape history and to detect human influences in high-elevation Alpine
areas on siliceous substrates.

Abstract

Application of relative and absolute dating techniques in the Alpine environment - The Late Pleistocene and Early
Holocene climate oscillation and the Alpine landscape evolution of Val di Rabbi (Trentino, Italy) were reconstructed using a combined
methodology of relative and absolute dating techniques. The research was carried out in the following four steps: 1) an earlier study
examined the investigated area (aerial photos, soil mapping etc.) to detect and sample the most representative sites (soils and boulders);
2) the extraction of the oldest organic matter fraction from the soil profiles followed by radiocarbon dating; 3) the comparison of the
14C dating results with the 10Be age sequence from representative boulders; 4) the addition of relative dating techniques to the absolute
ones to detect signals of Alpine landscape evolution. We found close links among the results obtained from the relative dating and the
absolute ones, showing the dynamics of an Alpine landscape within a relatively small area. The combination of relative and absolute
dating techniques is a promising tool for the reconstruction of landscape history and to detect human influences in high-elevation Alpine
areas on siliceous substrates.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:18 Nov 2009 10:32
Last Modified:21 Nov 2017 14:26
Publisher:Museo Tridentino di Scienze Naturali
ISSN:2035-7699
Official URL:http://www.mtsn.tn.it/pubblicazioni/riviste.asp?tipo=18
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F?func=direct&doc_number=005808002&current_base=ebi01
https://www.zora.uzh.ch/23732/
https://www.zora.uzh.ch/23750/

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