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Changes in the proteome after neuronal Zif268 overexpression


Baumgärtel, K; Tweedie-Cullen, R Y; Grossmann, J; Gehrig, P; Livingstone-Zatchej, M; Mansuy, I M (2009). Changes in the proteome after neuronal Zif268 overexpression. Journal of Proteome Research, 8(7):3298-3316.

Abstract

Long-lasting forms of brain plasticity are a cellular basis for long-term memory, and their disturbance underlies pathological conditions such as dementia and cognitive impairment. Neuronal plasticity is a complex process that utilizes molecular cascades in the cytoplasm and the nucleus and involves numerous transcription factors, in particular, immediate early genes (IEGs). The signaling cascades that control IEGs are fairly well described, but the downstream transcriptional response is poorly understood, especially its late components. Here, we investigated the response induced by the IEG Zif268 in the adult brain in relation to long-term memory. Using a mouse model with increased neuronal expression of Zif268 that leads to improved memory, we identified an ensemble of proteins regulated by Zif268 expression and differentiated between direct and indirect targets based on the presence of a consensus binding motif in their promoter. We show that Zif268 regulates numerous substrates with diverse biological functions including protein modification and degradation (proteasome-core complex), phosphorylation, cell division, sensory perception, metabolism, and metal ion transport. The results provide a comprehensive and quantitative data set characterizing the Zif268-dependent proteome in the adult mouse brain and offers biologically important new insight into activity-dependent pathways downstream of IEGs.

Abstract

Long-lasting forms of brain plasticity are a cellular basis for long-term memory, and their disturbance underlies pathological conditions such as dementia and cognitive impairment. Neuronal plasticity is a complex process that utilizes molecular cascades in the cytoplasm and the nucleus and involves numerous transcription factors, in particular, immediate early genes (IEGs). The signaling cascades that control IEGs are fairly well described, but the downstream transcriptional response is poorly understood, especially its late components. Here, we investigated the response induced by the IEG Zif268 in the adult brain in relation to long-term memory. Using a mouse model with increased neuronal expression of Zif268 that leads to improved memory, we identified an ensemble of proteins regulated by Zif268 expression and differentiated between direct and indirect targets based on the presence of a consensus binding motif in their promoter. We show that Zif268 regulates numerous substrates with diverse biological functions including protein modification and degradation (proteasome-core complex), phosphorylation, cell division, sensory perception, metabolism, and metal ion transport. The results provide a comprehensive and quantitative data set characterizing the Zif268-dependent proteome in the adult mouse brain and offers biologically important new insight into activity-dependent pathways downstream of IEGs.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
Special Collections > SystemsX.ch
Special Collections > SystemsX.ch > Interdisciplinary PhD Projects
08 University Research Priority Programs > Systems Biology / Functional Genomics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2009
Deposited On:23 Nov 2009 08:38
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 23:20
Publisher:American Chemical Society
ISSN:1535-3893
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1021/pr801000r
PubMed ID:19374395

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