Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

In vitro vascularization of human connective microtissues


Kelm, J M; Moritz, W; Schmidt, D; Hoerstrup, S P; Fussenegger, M (2007). In vitro vascularization of human connective microtissues. In: Tissue Engineering. Springer: Humana Press, 153-166.

Abstract

Vascularization is one of the most central processes enabling multicellular life. Owing to the complexity of vascularization regulatory networks, minor control imbalances often have severe pathologic consequences ranging from ischemic diseases to cancer. Tissue engineers are immediately confronted with vascularization as artificial tissues of a clinically relevant size require a vascular system to ensure vital physiologic logistics throughout the entire tissue and to enable rapid connection to the host vasculature following implantation. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) coated onto a human aortic fibroblast (HAF) core microtissue generated by gravity-enforced self-assembly in hanging drops, we created a tissue-culture system for studying capillary network formation. We provide comprehensive technical insight into the design and analysis of prototype vascularization in multicell-type-based microtissues. Detailed understanding of generic processes managing capillary formation in human tissue culture may foster advances in the development of clinical tissue implants.

Abstract

Vascularization is one of the most central processes enabling multicellular life. Owing to the complexity of vascularization regulatory networks, minor control imbalances often have severe pathologic consequences ranging from ischemic diseases to cancer. Tissue engineers are immediately confronted with vascularization as artificial tissues of a clinically relevant size require a vascular system to ensure vital physiologic logistics throughout the entire tissue and to enable rapid connection to the host vasculature following implantation. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) coated onto a human aortic fibroblast (HAF) core microtissue generated by gravity-enforced self-assembly in hanging drops, we created a tissue-culture system for studying capillary network formation. We provide comprehensive technical insight into the design and analysis of prototype vascularization in multicell-type-based microtissues. Detailed understanding of generic processes managing capillary formation in human tissue culture may foster advances in the development of clinical tissue implants.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:08 Dec 2009 16:08
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 21:56
Publisher:Humana Press
Series Name:Methods in Molecular Medicine
Number:140
ISSN:1543-1894 (P) 1940-6037 (E)
ISBN:978-1-58829-756-3 (P) 978-1-59745-443-8 (E)
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-443-8_9
PubMed ID:18085208

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher