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Psychological processing of transplantation in lung recipients: a quantitative study of organ integration and the relationship to the donor


Goetzmann, L; Irani, S; Moser, K S; Schwegler, K; Stamm, M; Spindler, A; Buddeberg, C; Schmid, C; Boehler, A; Klaghofer, R (2009). Psychological processing of transplantation in lung recipients: a quantitative study of organ integration and the relationship to the donor. British Journal of Health Psychology, 14(Pt 4):667-680.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Lung recipients undergo a complex psychological process, including organ integration and processing of attitudes towards the organ donor. DESIGN: Seventy-six lung recipients were asked to participate in a cross-sectional questionnaire study on the psychological processing of lung transplants. METHODS: The questionnaire consisted of statements describing aspects of organ integration and the patient's relationship with the donor. Furthermore, chronic stress/psychological distress (Screening Scale of the Trier Inventory; Symptom Checklist SCL-K-9) and the emotional effects of transplantation/immunosuppression (Transplant Effects Questionnaire; Medication Experience Scale for Immunosuppressants) were assessed. RESULTS: In general, lung recipients perceive the transplant as part of themselves (97.4%) and not as a foreign object (90%). One-third of patients still have frequent thoughts about the donor, whilst the majority (80.3%) do not believe that they have adopted the donor's characteristic traits. Factor analysis reveals the two-dimensional structure of the questionnaire items 'organ integration' (factor 1) and 'relationship to the donor' (factor 2). Poor organ integration predicts low adherence, low disclosure and high feelings of guilt, whilst a close donor relationship predicts chronic stress and psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: Poor organ integration and a close relationship to the donor should be borne in mind in psychosocial treatment regarding the patient's adherence behaviour and psychological distress.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Lung recipients undergo a complex psychological process, including organ integration and processing of attitudes towards the organ donor. DESIGN: Seventy-six lung recipients were asked to participate in a cross-sectional questionnaire study on the psychological processing of lung transplants. METHODS: The questionnaire consisted of statements describing aspects of organ integration and the patient's relationship with the donor. Furthermore, chronic stress/psychological distress (Screening Scale of the Trier Inventory; Symptom Checklist SCL-K-9) and the emotional effects of transplantation/immunosuppression (Transplant Effects Questionnaire; Medication Experience Scale for Immunosuppressants) were assessed. RESULTS: In general, lung recipients perceive the transplant as part of themselves (97.4%) and not as a foreign object (90%). One-third of patients still have frequent thoughts about the donor, whilst the majority (80.3%) do not believe that they have adopted the donor's characteristic traits. Factor analysis reveals the two-dimensional structure of the questionnaire items 'organ integration' (factor 1) and 'relationship to the donor' (factor 2). Poor organ integration predicts low adherence, low disclosure and high feelings of guilt, whilst a close donor relationship predicts chronic stress and psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: Poor organ integration and a close relationship to the donor should be borne in mind in psychosocial treatment regarding the patient's adherence behaviour and psychological distress.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Psychosocial Medicine (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:24 Nov 2009 09:21
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 23:21
Publisher:British Psychological Society
ISSN:1359-107X
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1348/135910708X399447
PubMed ID:19171083

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