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Microarray technology as a universal tool for high-throughput analysis of biological systems


Sobek, J; Bartscherer, K; Jacob, A; Hoheisel, J D; Angenendt, P (2006). Microarray technology as a universal tool for high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Combinatorial chemistry & high throughput screening, 9(5):365-380.

Abstract

Over the last years microarray technology has become one of the principal platform technologies for the high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Starting with the construction of first DNA microarrays in the 1990s, microarray technology has flourished in the last years and many different new formats have been developed. Peptide and protein microarrays are now applied for the elucidation of interaction partners, modification sites and enzyme substrates. Antibody microarrays are envisaged to be of high importance for the high-throughput determination of protein abundances in translational profiling approaches. First cell microarrays have been constructed to transform microarray technology from an in vitro technology to an in vivo functional analysis tool. All of these approaches share a common prerequisite: the solid support on which they are generated. The demands on this solid support are thereby as manifold as the applications themselves. This review is aimed to display the recent developments in surface chemistry and derivatization, and to summarize the latest developments in the different application areas of microarray technology.

Abstract

Over the last years microarray technology has become one of the principal platform technologies for the high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Starting with the construction of first DNA microarrays in the 1990s, microarray technology has flourished in the last years and many different new formats have been developed. Peptide and protein microarrays are now applied for the elucidation of interaction partners, modification sites and enzyme substrates. Antibody microarrays are envisaged to be of high importance for the high-throughput determination of protein abundances in translational profiling approaches. First cell microarrays have been constructed to transform microarray technology from an in vitro technology to an in vivo functional analysis tool. All of these approaches share a common prerequisite: the solid support on which they are generated. The demands on this solid support are thereby as manifold as the applications themselves. This review is aimed to display the recent developments in surface chemistry and derivatization, and to summarize the latest developments in the different application areas of microarray technology.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
08 University Research Priority Programs > Systems Biology / Functional Genomics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2006
Deposited On:18 Dec 2009 09:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:35
Publisher:Combinatorial Chemistry & High Throughput Screening
ISSN:1386-2073
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2174/138620706777452429
PubMed ID:16787150

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