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New candidate targets of AMP-activated protein kinase in murine brain revealed by a novel multidimensional substrate-screen for protein kinases - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Tuerk, R D; Thali, R F; Auchli, Y; Rechsteiner, H; Brunisholz, R A; Schlattner, U; Wallimann, T; Neumann, D (2007). New candidate targets of AMP-activated protein kinase in murine brain revealed by a novel multidimensional substrate-screen for protein kinases. Journal of Proteome Research, 6(8):3266-3277.

Abstract

AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine kinase that is involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis and recovery from metabolic stresses both at the cellular and whole body level. AMPK is found in all tissues examined so far, and a number of downstream targets have been identified. Recent work suggests that AMPK has specialized functions in the brain, such as involvement in appetite control. Nevertheless, brain-specific substrates of AMPK are unknown. Here, we performed a proteomic in vitro screen to identify new putative AMPK targets in brain. Prefractionation of murine brain lysates by liquid chromatography, utilizing four different, serially connected columns with different chemistries was found to be superior to a single column method. A pilot screen involving incubation of small volumes of individual fractions with radiolabeled ATP in the presence or absence of active AMPK, followed by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and autoradiography, revealed the presence of potential AMPK substrates in a number of different fractions. On the basis of these results, several kinase assays were repeated with selected fractions on a preparative scale. Following separation of the radiolabeled proteins by two-dimensional electrophoresis and comparison of samples with or without added AMPK by differential autoradiography, 53 AMPK-specific phospho-spots were detected and excised. Thereof, 26 unique proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and were considered as new potential downstream targets of AMPK. Kinase assays with 14 highly purified candidate substrate proteins confirmed that at least 12 were direct targets of AMPK in vitro. Although the physiological consequences of these phosphorylation events remain to be established, hypotheses concerning the most intriguing potential targets of AMPK that have been identified by this search are discussed herein. Our data suggests that signaling by AMPK in brain is likely to be involved in the regulation of pathways that have not yet been linked to this kinase.

Abstract

AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine kinase that is involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis and recovery from metabolic stresses both at the cellular and whole body level. AMPK is found in all tissues examined so far, and a number of downstream targets have been identified. Recent work suggests that AMPK has specialized functions in the brain, such as involvement in appetite control. Nevertheless, brain-specific substrates of AMPK are unknown. Here, we performed a proteomic in vitro screen to identify new putative AMPK targets in brain. Prefractionation of murine brain lysates by liquid chromatography, utilizing four different, serially connected columns with different chemistries was found to be superior to a single column method. A pilot screen involving incubation of small volumes of individual fractions with radiolabeled ATP in the presence or absence of active AMPK, followed by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and autoradiography, revealed the presence of potential AMPK substrates in a number of different fractions. On the basis of these results, several kinase assays were repeated with selected fractions on a preparative scale. Following separation of the radiolabeled proteins by two-dimensional electrophoresis and comparison of samples with or without added AMPK by differential autoradiography, 53 AMPK-specific phospho-spots were detected and excised. Thereof, 26 unique proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and were considered as new potential downstream targets of AMPK. Kinase assays with 14 highly purified candidate substrate proteins confirmed that at least 12 were direct targets of AMPK in vitro. Although the physiological consequences of these phosphorylation events remain to be established, hypotheses concerning the most intriguing potential targets of AMPK that have been identified by this search are discussed herein. Our data suggests that signaling by AMPK in brain is likely to be involved in the regulation of pathways that have not yet been linked to this kinase.

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24 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
08 University Research Priority Programs > Systems Biology / Functional Genomics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2007
Deposited On:28 Dec 2009 07:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:35
Publisher:American Chemical Society
ISSN:1535-3893
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1021/pr070160a
PubMed ID:17608512

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