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How to Deal with Weak Interactions in Noncovalent Complexes Analyzed by Electrospray Mass Spectrometry: Cyclopeptidic Inhibitors of the Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 1-STAT6


Touboul, D; Maillard, L; Grässlin, A; Moumne, R; Seitz, M; Robinson, J A; Zenobi, R (2009). How to Deal with Weak Interactions in Noncovalent Complexes Analyzed by Electrospray Mass Spectrometry: Cyclopeptidic Inhibitors of the Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 1-STAT6. Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 20(2):303-311.

Abstract

Mass spectrometry, and especially electrospray ionization, is now an efficient tool to study noncovalent interactions between proteins and inhibitors. It is used here to study the interaction of some weak inhibitors with the NCoA-1/STAT6 protein with KD values in the μM range. High signal intensities corresponding to some nonspecific electrostatic interactions between NCoA-1 and the oppositely charged inhibitors were observed by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry, due to the use of high ligand concentrations. Diverse strategies have already been developed to deal with nonspecific interactions, such as controlled dissociation in the gas phase, mathematical modeling, or the use of a reference protein to monitor the appearance of nonspecific complexes. We demonstrate here that this last methodology, validated only in the case of neutral sugar–protein interactions, i.e., where dipole–dipole interactions are crucial, is not relevant in the case of strong electrostatic interactions. Thus, we developed a novel strategy based on half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) measurements in a competitive assay with readout by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. IC50 values determined by MS were finally converted into dissociation constants that showed very good agreement with values determined in the liquid phase using a fluorescence polarization assay.

Abstract

Mass spectrometry, and especially electrospray ionization, is now an efficient tool to study noncovalent interactions between proteins and inhibitors. It is used here to study the interaction of some weak inhibitors with the NCoA-1/STAT6 protein with KD values in the μM range. High signal intensities corresponding to some nonspecific electrostatic interactions between NCoA-1 and the oppositely charged inhibitors were observed by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry, due to the use of high ligand concentrations. Diverse strategies have already been developed to deal with nonspecific interactions, such as controlled dissociation in the gas phase, mathematical modeling, or the use of a reference protein to monitor the appearance of nonspecific complexes. We demonstrate here that this last methodology, validated only in the case of neutral sugar–protein interactions, i.e., where dipole–dipole interactions are crucial, is not relevant in the case of strong electrostatic interactions. Thus, we developed a novel strategy based on half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) measurements in a competitive assay with readout by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. IC50 values determined by MS were finally converted into dissociation constants that showed very good agreement with values determined in the liquid phase using a fluorescence polarization assay.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Date:February 2009
Deposited On:30 Dec 2009 09:51
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 22:11
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1044-0305
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasms.2008.10.008

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