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GABAA receptors, gephyrin and homeostatic synaptic plasticity


Tyagarajan, S K; Fritschy, J M (2010). GABAA receptors, gephyrin and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Journal of Physiology, 588(1):101-106.

Abstract

Homeostatic synaptic plasticity describes the changes in synapse gain and function that occur in response to global changes in neuronal activity to maintain the stability of neuronal networks. In this review, we argue that a coordinated regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission is essential for maintaining CNS function while allowing both global and local changes in synaptic strength and connectivity. Therefore, we postulate that homeostatic synaptic plasticity depends on signaling cascades regulating in parallel the efficacy of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission. Since neurotransmitter receptors interact closely with scaffolding proteins in the postsynaptic density, this coordinated regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission likely involves posttranslational modifications of scaffolding proteins, which in turn modulate local synaptic function. Here we review the current state of knowledge on the regulation of GABAA receptors and their main scaffolding protein gephyrin by posttranslational modifications; we outline future lines of research that might contribute to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating GABAergic synapse function and homeostatic plasticity.

Abstract

Homeostatic synaptic plasticity describes the changes in synapse gain and function that occur in response to global changes in neuronal activity to maintain the stability of neuronal networks. In this review, we argue that a coordinated regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission is essential for maintaining CNS function while allowing both global and local changes in synaptic strength and connectivity. Therefore, we postulate that homeostatic synaptic plasticity depends on signaling cascades regulating in parallel the efficacy of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission. Since neurotransmitter receptors interact closely with scaffolding proteins in the postsynaptic density, this coordinated regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission likely involves posttranslational modifications of scaffolding proteins, which in turn modulate local synaptic function. Here we review the current state of knowledge on the regulation of GABAA receptors and their main scaffolding protein gephyrin by posttranslational modifications; we outline future lines of research that might contribute to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating GABAergic synapse function and homeostatic plasticity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 January 2010
Deposited On:02 Dec 2009 14:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:36
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0022-3751
Additional Information:This review was presented at a symposium on Neurophysiology of inhibitory & excitatory amino acid receptors which took place at the 11th International Congress on Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins, Vienna, on 3 August 2009.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2009.178517
PubMed ID:19752109

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