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Influence of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on psychomotor symptoms in major depression


Hoeppner, J; Padberg, F; Domes, G; Zinke, A; Herpertz, S C; Grossheinrich, N; Herwig, U (2010). Influence of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on psychomotor symptoms in major depression. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 260(3):197-202.

Abstract

Psychomotor symptoms related to an impairment of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system are frequent in major depression (MD). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been discussed as a new treatment option for MD. In neurobiological terms, an influence of high-frequency rTMS on dopaminergic neurotransmission has previously been shown by several studies in animals and humans. Therefore, an improvement of psychomotor symptoms by rTMS could be assumed. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of high-frequency rTMS on psychomotor retardation and agitation in depressive patients. We investigated the effect of left prefrontal 10 Hz rTMS on psychomotor retardation and agitation in 30 patients with MD. Patients were randomly assigned to real or sham rTMS in addition to a newly initiated standardized antidepressant medication. We found a trend in the reduction of agitation (t (28) = 1.76, p = 0.09, two-tailed), but not in the reduction of retardation. Furthermore, no general additional antidepressant effect of rTMS was observed. Although there was no statistical significant influence of high-frequency rTMS on psychomotor symptoms in depressive patients, the results showed a trend in the reduction of psychomotor agitation in MD. This effect should be systematically investigated as the primary end point in further studies with larger sample sizes.

Abstract

Psychomotor symptoms related to an impairment of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system are frequent in major depression (MD). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been discussed as a new treatment option for MD. In neurobiological terms, an influence of high-frequency rTMS on dopaminergic neurotransmission has previously been shown by several studies in animals and humans. Therefore, an improvement of psychomotor symptoms by rTMS could be assumed. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of high-frequency rTMS on psychomotor retardation and agitation in depressive patients. We investigated the effect of left prefrontal 10 Hz rTMS on psychomotor retardation and agitation in 30 patients with MD. Patients were randomly assigned to real or sham rTMS in addition to a newly initiated standardized antidepressant medication. We found a trend in the reduction of agitation (t (28) = 1.76, p = 0.09, two-tailed), but not in the reduction of retardation. Furthermore, no general additional antidepressant effect of rTMS was observed. Although there was no statistical significant influence of high-frequency rTMS on psychomotor symptoms in depressive patients, the results showed a trend in the reduction of psychomotor agitation in MD. This effect should be systematically investigated as the primary end point in further studies with larger sample sizes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2010
Deposited On:15 Jan 2010 14:38
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 22:28
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0940-1334
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00406-009-0039-8
PubMed ID:19680706

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