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Repetition suppression and plasticity in the human brain


Garrido, M I; Kilner, J M; Kiebel, S J; Stephan, K E; Baldeweg, T; Friston, K J (2009). Repetition suppression and plasticity in the human brain. NeuroImage, 48(1):269-279.

Abstract

The suppression of neuronal responses to a repeated event is a ubiquitous phenomenon in neuroscience. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine the temporal evolution of experience-dependent changes in connectivity induced by repeated stimuli. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) during frequency changes of a repeating tone. Bayesian inversion of dynamic causal models (DCM) of ERPs revealed systematic repetition-dependent changes in both intrinsic and extrinsic connections, within a hierarchical cortical network. Critically, these changes occurred very quickly, over inter-stimulus intervals that implicate short-term synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, intrinsic (within-source) connections showed biphasic changes that were much faster than changes in extrinsic (between-source) connections, which decreased monotonically with repetition. This study shows that auditory perceptual learning is associated with repetition-dependent plasticity in the human brain. It is remarkable that distinct changes in intrinsic and extrinsic connections could be quantified so reliably and non-invasively using EEG.

Abstract

The suppression of neuronal responses to a repeated event is a ubiquitous phenomenon in neuroscience. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine the temporal evolution of experience-dependent changes in connectivity induced by repeated stimuli. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) during frequency changes of a repeating tone. Bayesian inversion of dynamic causal models (DCM) of ERPs revealed systematic repetition-dependent changes in both intrinsic and extrinsic connections, within a hierarchical cortical network. Critically, these changes occurred very quickly, over inter-stimulus intervals that implicate short-term synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, intrinsic (within-source) connections showed biphasic changes that were much faster than changes in extrinsic (between-source) connections, which decreased monotonically with repetition. This study shows that auditory perceptual learning is associated with repetition-dependent plasticity in the human brain. It is remarkable that distinct changes in intrinsic and extrinsic connections could be quantified so reliably and non-invasively using EEG.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:19 Jan 2010 23:31
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 22:29
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.06.034
PubMed ID:19540921

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