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Thinking about my generation: adaptive effects of a dual age identity in later adulthood


Weiss, D; Lang, F R (2009). Thinking about my generation: adaptive effects of a dual age identity in later adulthood. Psychology and Aging, 24(3):729-34.

Abstract

Growing old involves experiences of losses. Yet, it is not clear whether one's cohort group membership poses a resource in later adulthood. The authors examined the role of a dual age identity (age group vs. generation) across adulthood and possible adaptive effects on future time perspective and well-being. Findings suggest that when generation membership is salient, older (but not young and middle-aged) participants display a stronger identification with same-aged people than when age group membership is salient. Additionally, results demonstrate that the dual age identity represents a significant component of the self-concept and well-being in older adults.

Abstract

Growing old involves experiences of losses. Yet, it is not clear whether one's cohort group membership poses a resource in later adulthood. The authors examined the role of a dual age identity (age group vs. generation) across adulthood and possible adaptive effects on future time perspective and well-being. Findings suggest that when generation membership is salient, older (but not young and middle-aged) participants display a stronger identification with same-aged people than when age group membership is salient. Additionally, results demonstrate that the dual age identity represents a significant component of the self-concept and well-being in older adults.

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21 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:September 2009
Deposited On:17 Feb 2010 11:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:38
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0882-7974
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0016339
PubMed ID:19739929

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