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Epidemiology of travelers' diarrhea in Thailand


Chongsuvivatwong, V; Chariyalertsak, S; McNeil, E; Aiyarak, S; Hutamai, S; Dupont, H L; Jiang, Z D; Kalambaheti, T; Tonyong, W; Thitiphuree, S; Steffen, R (2009). Epidemiology of travelers' diarrhea in Thailand. Journal of Travel Medicine, 16(3):179-185.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Current data on risk of travelers' diarrhea (TD) among visitors to Thailand largely comes from US military personnel, Peace Corps volunteers, or expatriates. We performed a 14-month systematic study of the incidence rate and characteristics of TD and a smaller study of etiology of the disease among visitors to Phuket and Chiang Mai. METHODS: One randomly selected day each week from August 2005 until October 2006, data were collected from foreign tourists departing from airports serving Phuket and Chiang Mai. A separate subgroup of subjects with TD acquired in Phuket were invited to submit a stool sample for enteropathogens. RESULTS: Based on 22,401 completed questionnaires, the attack rate for TD was highest among residents from Australia or New Zealand (16%), while those from the United States and Europe had attack rates of 7% to 8%. Independent risk factors for the development of TD were eating outside the hotel and eating meat. In contrast, a history of drinking tap water and consuming ice cream were protective. In 56 subjects studied for etiology, Aeromonas spp were found in 8 subjects (14%), enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) or Vibrio spp each was found in 7 (13%) with O1 V. cholera (cholera) seen in one, mixed pathogens were found in 3 (5%), with no pathogen being detected in 33 (59%). CONCLUSIONS: Phuket and Chiang Mai should not be considered high-risk destinations for development of TD among US and European travelers to Thailand. In the study, Aeromonas, ETEC, and Vibrio spp were the most frequent enteropathogens identified.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Current data on risk of travelers' diarrhea (TD) among visitors to Thailand largely comes from US military personnel, Peace Corps volunteers, or expatriates. We performed a 14-month systematic study of the incidence rate and characteristics of TD and a smaller study of etiology of the disease among visitors to Phuket and Chiang Mai. METHODS: One randomly selected day each week from August 2005 until October 2006, data were collected from foreign tourists departing from airports serving Phuket and Chiang Mai. A separate subgroup of subjects with TD acquired in Phuket were invited to submit a stool sample for enteropathogens. RESULTS: Based on 22,401 completed questionnaires, the attack rate for TD was highest among residents from Australia or New Zealand (16%), while those from the United States and Europe had attack rates of 7% to 8%. Independent risk factors for the development of TD were eating outside the hotel and eating meat. In contrast, a history of drinking tap water and consuming ice cream were protective. In 56 subjects studied for etiology, Aeromonas spp were found in 8 subjects (14%), enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) or Vibrio spp each was found in 7 (13%) with O1 V. cholera (cholera) seen in one, mixed pathogens were found in 3 (5%), with no pathogen being detected in 33 (59%). CONCLUSIONS: Phuket and Chiang Mai should not be considered high-risk destinations for development of TD among US and European travelers to Thailand. In the study, Aeromonas, ETEC, and Vibrio spp were the most frequent enteropathogens identified.

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12 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:14 Dec 2009 15:29
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 22:33
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1195-1982
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2009.00331.x
PubMed ID:19538578

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