Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Transfer effects of practice for simple alternating movements


Koeneke, S; Battista, C; Jäncke, Lutz; Peters, M (2009). Transfer effects of practice for simple alternating movements. Journal of Motor Behavior, 41(4):347-355.

Abstract

In studies on transfer of practice effects, researchers use simple or complex movements that involve a significant cognitive element. In the present study, the authors studied intermanual and intramanual transfer of practice with a task that can be considered intermediate in difficulty. Using finger tapping as a motor task, 30 participants practiced tapping 6 days per week for 2 weeks with the left or right middle finger in a between-subject design. Compared with controls, the unpracticed middle finger of both hands showed significant improvement, along with all of the other unpracticed digits. There was no significant difference in the strength of transfer from the practiced finger to other fingers of the same (intramanual transfer) or the other (intermanual transfer) hand. The authors did not observe an asymmetry of transfer effects (the degree to which transfer depends on the particular hand trained). Last, in terms of speed and regularity of movement, the digits broke down into 2 different clusters; the thumb, index finger, and middle finger formed 1 cluster superior to that formed by the ring and small fingers.

Abstract

In studies on transfer of practice effects, researchers use simple or complex movements that involve a significant cognitive element. In the present study, the authors studied intermanual and intramanual transfer of practice with a task that can be considered intermediate in difficulty. Using finger tapping as a motor task, 30 participants practiced tapping 6 days per week for 2 weeks with the left or right middle finger in a between-subject design. Compared with controls, the unpracticed middle finger of both hands showed significant improvement, along with all of the other unpracticed digits. There was no significant difference in the strength of transfer from the practiced finger to other fingers of the same (intramanual transfer) or the other (intermanual transfer) hand. The authors did not observe an asymmetry of transfer effects (the degree to which transfer depends on the particular hand trained). Last, in terms of speed and regularity of movement, the digits broke down into 2 different clusters; the thumb, index finger, and middle finger formed 1 cluster superior to that formed by the ring and small fingers.

Statistics

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 August 2009
Deposited On:20 Jan 2010 14:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:38
Publisher:Heldref Publications
ISSN:0022-2895
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3200/JMBR.41.4.347-356
PubMed ID:19508961

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher