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Ultrasonography of the gastrointestinal tract in cattle - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Braun, U (2009). Ultrasonography of the gastrointestinal tract in cattle. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice, 25(3):567-590.

Abstract

Ultrasonography is an ideal diagnostic tool for the investigation of bovine gastrointestinal
disorders, the most common of which are traumatic reticuloperitonitis, left and
right displacement of the abomasum, ileus of the small intestine, and dilatation and
displacement of the cecum. An ultrasonographic examination is performed on nonsedated,
standing cattle using a 3.5 MHz to 5.0 linear or convex transducer. When
a tentative diagnosis has been made based on the clinical findings, often only the
region in question is examined. For example, in cases with suspected traumatic reticuloperitonitis,
the examination is performed in the sternal and parasternal regions, and
in cattle suspected of having cholestasis, only the costal part of the abdominal wall on
the right side is examined. Even experienced clinicians may not be able to pinpoint the
organ affected and make a diagnosis in patients in which abdominal disease is suspected,
however. In such cases, both sides of the abdomen are examined. Normally,
the reticulum,1,2 spleen,1–4 rumen,2 and parts of the abomasum5,6 are seen on the left
side, and the liver,7–9 omasum,10,11 parts of the abomasum,5,6 small intestine,12,13
large intestine,14,15 and right kidney16 are seen on the right. The uterus may be seen
on either side depending on the stage of pregnancy.
This article describes the ultrasonographic techniques used for examination of the
reticulum, rumen, omasum, abomasum, small intestine, and large intestine. The
normal findings are presented followed by a description of the most important
diseases of these organs.

Abstract

Ultrasonography is an ideal diagnostic tool for the investigation of bovine gastrointestinal
disorders, the most common of which are traumatic reticuloperitonitis, left and
right displacement of the abomasum, ileus of the small intestine, and dilatation and
displacement of the cecum. An ultrasonographic examination is performed on nonsedated,
standing cattle using a 3.5 MHz to 5.0 linear or convex transducer. When
a tentative diagnosis has been made based on the clinical findings, often only the
region in question is examined. For example, in cases with suspected traumatic reticuloperitonitis,
the examination is performed in the sternal and parasternal regions, and
in cattle suspected of having cholestasis, only the costal part of the abdominal wall on
the right side is examined. Even experienced clinicians may not be able to pinpoint the
organ affected and make a diagnosis in patients in which abdominal disease is suspected,
however. In such cases, both sides of the abdomen are examined. Normally,
the reticulum,1,2 spleen,1–4 rumen,2 and parts of the abomasum5,6 are seen on the left
side, and the liver,7–9 omasum,10,11 parts of the abomasum,5,6 small intestine,12,13
large intestine,14,15 and right kidney16 are seen on the right. The uterus may be seen
on either side depending on the stage of pregnancy.
This article describes the ultrasonographic techniques used for examination of the
reticulum, rumen, omasum, abomasum, small intestine, and large intestine. The
normal findings are presented followed by a description of the most important
diseases of these organs.

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34 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:November 2009
Deposited On:06 Jan 2010 14:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0749-0720
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cvfa.2009.07.004
PubMed ID:19825434

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