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Association between waste management and cancer in companion animals


Marconato, L; Leo, C; Girelli, R; Salvi, S; Abramo, F; Bettini, G; Comazzi, S; Nardi, P; Albanese, F; Zini, E (2009). Association between waste management and cancer in companion animals. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 23(3):564-569.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Increased cancer rates have been documented in people residing in areas around Naples characterized by illegal dumping and incineration of waste. HYPOTHESIS: Risk of cancer in dogs and cats is associated with waste management. ANIMALS: Four hundred and fifty-three dogs and cats with cancer and 1,554 cancer-free animals. METHODS: Hospital-based case-control study in Naples (low danger) and nearby cities having a history of illegal waste dumping (high danger). Odds ratio (OR) between high- and low-danger areas was calculated for all tumors and various malignancies in dogs and cats. RESULTS: An increased risk for cancer development was identified in dogs but not in cats residing in high-danger areas (OR: 1.55; 95% confidence interval: 1.18-2.03; P < .01). A 2.39-fold increased risk of lymphoma (P < .01) accounted for the greater tumor frequency in dogs residing in high-danger areas. The risk of mast cell tumor and mammary cancer did not differ in dogs residing in high- or low-danger areas. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Waste emission from illegal dumping sites increases cancer risk in dogs residing in high-danger areas. An increased prevalence of lymphoma has been previously recognized in humans living close to illegal waste dumps. Thus, epidemiological studies of spontaneous tumors in dogs might suggest a role for environmental factors in canine and human carcinogenesis and can predict health hazards for humans

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Increased cancer rates have been documented in people residing in areas around Naples characterized by illegal dumping and incineration of waste. HYPOTHESIS: Risk of cancer in dogs and cats is associated with waste management. ANIMALS: Four hundred and fifty-three dogs and cats with cancer and 1,554 cancer-free animals. METHODS: Hospital-based case-control study in Naples (low danger) and nearby cities having a history of illegal waste dumping (high danger). Odds ratio (OR) between high- and low-danger areas was calculated for all tumors and various malignancies in dogs and cats. RESULTS: An increased risk for cancer development was identified in dogs but not in cats residing in high-danger areas (OR: 1.55; 95% confidence interval: 1.18-2.03; P < .01). A 2.39-fold increased risk of lymphoma (P < .01) accounted for the greater tumor frequency in dogs residing in high-danger areas. The risk of mast cell tumor and mammary cancer did not differ in dogs residing in high- or low-danger areas. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Waste emission from illegal dumping sites increases cancer risk in dogs residing in high-danger areas. An increased prevalence of lymphoma has been previously recognized in humans living close to illegal waste dumps. Thus, epidemiological studies of spontaneous tumors in dogs might suggest a role for environmental factors in canine and human carcinogenesis and can predict health hazards for humans

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Date:2009
Deposited On:11 Jan 2010 15:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0891-6640
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2009.0278.x
PubMed ID:19298612

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