Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Glucocorticoids and the regulation of memory in health and disease


de Quervain, D J F; Aerni, A; Schelling, G; Roozendaal, B (2009). Glucocorticoids and the regulation of memory in health and disease. Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology, 30(3):358-370.

Abstract

Over the last decades considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that glucocorticoids - stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex - are crucially involved in the regulation of memory. Specifically, glucocorticoids have been shown to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing experiences, but impair memory retrieval and working memory during emotionally arousing test situations. Furthermore, growing evidence indicates that these different glucocorticoid effects all depend on emotional arousal-induced activation of noradrenergic transmission within the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) and on interactions of the BLA with other brain regions, such as the hippocampus and neocortical regions. Here we review findings from both animal and human experiments and present an integrated perspective of how these opposite glucocorticoid effects might act together to serve adaptive processing of emotionally significant information. Furthermore, as intense emotional memories also play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology of anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or phobias, we discuss to what extent the basic findings on glucocorticoid effects on emotional memory might have implications for the understanding and treatment of these clinical conditions. In this context, we review data suggesting that the administration of glucocorticoids might ameliorate chronic anxiety by reducing retrieval of aversive memories and enhancing fear extinction.

Abstract

Over the last decades considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that glucocorticoids - stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex - are crucially involved in the regulation of memory. Specifically, glucocorticoids have been shown to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing experiences, but impair memory retrieval and working memory during emotionally arousing test situations. Furthermore, growing evidence indicates that these different glucocorticoid effects all depend on emotional arousal-induced activation of noradrenergic transmission within the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) and on interactions of the BLA with other brain regions, such as the hippocampus and neocortical regions. Here we review findings from both animal and human experiments and present an integrated perspective of how these opposite glucocorticoid effects might act together to serve adaptive processing of emotionally significant information. Furthermore, as intense emotional memories also play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology of anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or phobias, we discuss to what extent the basic findings on glucocorticoid effects on emotional memory might have implications for the understanding and treatment of these clinical conditions. In this context, we review data suggesting that the administration of glucocorticoids might ameliorate chronic anxiety by reducing retrieval of aversive memories and enhancing fear extinction.

Statistics

Citations

246 citations in Web of Science®
275 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:03 Jan 2010 11:50
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-3022
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2009.03.002
PubMed ID:19341764

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations