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Feline rabies. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management.


Frymus, T; Addie, D; Belák, S; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Egberink, H; Gruffydd-Jones, T; Hartmann, K; Hosie, M J; Lloret, A; Lutz, H; Marsilio, F; Pennisi, M G; Radford, A D; Thiry, E; Truyen, U; Horzinek, M C (2009). Feline rabies. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 11(7):585-593.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Rabies virus belongs to the genus Lyssavirus, together with European bat lyssaviruses 1 and 2. In clinical practice, rabies virus is easily inactivated by detergent-based disinfectants. INFECTION: Rabid animals are the only source of infection. Virus is shed in the saliva some days before the onset of clinical signs and transmitted through a bite or a scratch to the skin or mucous membranes. The average incubation period in cats is 2 months, but may vary from 2 weeks to several months, or even years. DISEASE SIGNS: Any unexplained aggressive behaviour or sudden behavioural change in cats must be considered suspicious. Two disease manifestations have been identified in cats: the furious and the dumb form. Death occurs after a clinical course of 1-10 days. DIAGNOSIS: A definitive rabies diagnosis is obtained by post-mortem laboratory investigation. However, serological tests are used for post-vaccinal control, especially in the context of international movements. DISEASE MANAGEMENT: Post-exposure vaccination of cats depends on the national public health regulations, and is forbidden in many countries. VACCINATION RECOMMENDATIONS: A single rabies vaccination induces a long-lasting immunity. Kittens should be vaccinated at 12-16 weeks of age to avoid interference from maternally derived antibodies and revaccinated 1 year later. Although some vaccines protect against virulent rabies virus challenge for 3 years or more, national or local legislation may call for annual boosters.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Rabies virus belongs to the genus Lyssavirus, together with European bat lyssaviruses 1 and 2. In clinical practice, rabies virus is easily inactivated by detergent-based disinfectants. INFECTION: Rabid animals are the only source of infection. Virus is shed in the saliva some days before the onset of clinical signs and transmitted through a bite or a scratch to the skin or mucous membranes. The average incubation period in cats is 2 months, but may vary from 2 weeks to several months, or even years. DISEASE SIGNS: Any unexplained aggressive behaviour or sudden behavioural change in cats must be considered suspicious. Two disease manifestations have been identified in cats: the furious and the dumb form. Death occurs after a clinical course of 1-10 days. DIAGNOSIS: A definitive rabies diagnosis is obtained by post-mortem laboratory investigation. However, serological tests are used for post-vaccinal control, especially in the context of international movements. DISEASE MANAGEMENT: Post-exposure vaccination of cats depends on the national public health regulations, and is forbidden in many countries. VACCINATION RECOMMENDATIONS: A single rabies vaccination induces a long-lasting immunity. Kittens should be vaccinated at 12-16 weeks of age to avoid interference from maternally derived antibodies and revaccinated 1 year later. Although some vaccines protect against virulent rabies virus challenge for 3 years or more, national or local legislation may call for annual boosters.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Date:2009
Deposited On:07 Jan 2010 14:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:42
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1098-612X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfms.2009.05.007
PubMed ID:19481038

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