Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Chimeric feline coronaviruses that encode type II spike protein on type I genetic background display accelerated viral growth and altered receptor usage


Tekes, G; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Bank-Wolf, B; Maier, R; Thiel, H J; Thiel, V (2010). Chimeric feline coronaviruses that encode type II spike protein on type I genetic background display accelerated viral growth and altered receptor usage. Journal of Virology, 84(3):1326-1333.

Abstract

Persistent infection of domestic cats with feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) can lead to a highly lethal, immunopathological disease termed feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Interestingly, there are two serotypes, type I and type II FCoVs that can both cause persistent infection and FIP even though their main determinant of host cell tropism, the spike (S) protein, is of different phylogeny and displays limited sequence identity. In cell culture however, there are apparent differences. Type II FCoVs can be propagated to high titers by employing feline aminopeptidase N (fAPN) as cellular receptor, whereas propagation of type I FCoVs is usually difficult and the involvement of fAPN as receptor is controversial. In this study we have analyzed the phenotypes of recombinant FCoVs that are based on the genetic background of the type I FCoV strain Black but encode the type II FCoV strain 79-1146 S protein. Our data demonstrate that the recombinant FCoVs expressing a type II FCoV S protein acquire the ability to efficiently use fAPN for host cell entry and corroborate the notion that type I FCoVs use another main host cell receptor. We also observed that the recombinant FCoVs display a large plaque phenotype and, unexpectedly, accelerated growth kinetics indistinguishable to that of the type II FCoV strain 79-1146. Thus, the main phenotypic differences of type I and type II FCoVs in cell culture, namely the growth kinetics and the efficient usage of fAPN as cellular receptor can be solely attributed to the FCoV S protein.

Abstract

Persistent infection of domestic cats with feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) can lead to a highly lethal, immunopathological disease termed feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Interestingly, there are two serotypes, type I and type II FCoVs that can both cause persistent infection and FIP even though their main determinant of host cell tropism, the spike (S) protein, is of different phylogeny and displays limited sequence identity. In cell culture however, there are apparent differences. Type II FCoVs can be propagated to high titers by employing feline aminopeptidase N (fAPN) as cellular receptor, whereas propagation of type I FCoVs is usually difficult and the involvement of fAPN as receptor is controversial. In this study we have analyzed the phenotypes of recombinant FCoVs that are based on the genetic background of the type I FCoV strain Black but encode the type II FCoV strain 79-1146 S protein. Our data demonstrate that the recombinant FCoVs expressing a type II FCoV S protein acquire the ability to efficiently use fAPN for host cell entry and corroborate the notion that type I FCoVs use another main host cell receptor. We also observed that the recombinant FCoVs display a large plaque phenotype and, unexpectedly, accelerated growth kinetics indistinguishable to that of the type II FCoV strain 79-1146. Thus, the main phenotypic differences of type I and type II FCoVs in cell culture, namely the growth kinetics and the efficient usage of fAPN as cellular receptor can be solely attributed to the FCoV S protein.

Statistics

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 22 Jan 2010
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:November 2010
Deposited On:22 Jan 2010 16:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:42
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology
ISSN:0022-538X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01568-09
PubMed ID:19906918

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 2MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations