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Benefit of a single preoperative dose of antibiotics in a sub-saharan district hospital: minimal input, massive impact


Saxer, F; Widmer, A; Fehr, J; Soka, I; Kibatala, P; Urassa, H; Frei, R; Smith, T; Hatz, C (2009). Benefit of a single preoperative dose of antibiotics in a sub-saharan district hospital: minimal input, massive impact. Annals of Surgery, 249(2):322-326.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a single-shot preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis (AMP) to reduce the rate of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) in a rural sub-Saharan hospital. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: We analyzed the incidence of SSIs in a rural Tanzanian hospital with very limited resources and found that AMP was administered after incision in 88% without covering the expected pathogens. Inadequacy and mistiming of AMP proved to be major risk factors for SSI in this study. Subsequently, 21.6% of patients developed an SSI after clean or clean-contaminated surgery, with 60% of detected pathogens being resistant to the administered antibiotics. In developed countries, preoperative single shot AMP is widely used and effective in the prevention of SSI. METHODS: Implementation and monitoring of guidelines for routine and adequate single shot AMP within 2 hours prior to incision in every clean and clean-contaminated intervention. RESULTS: In the preintervention group, 527 patients qualified for routine AMP that was administered in 88% of patients after incision and did not cover the expected pathogens to a large extent.114 patients (21.6%) developed an SSI, with 60% of detected pathogens being resistant to the administered antibiotics. After implementation of the guidelines, the incidence of SSIs significantly decreased from 21.6% to 4% (11/276). CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of a single shot AMP dramatically decreased the rate of SSI in a hospital with very limited resources. Such guidelines, developed by industrialized countries, are even more effective in non-industrialized countries.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a single-shot preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis (AMP) to reduce the rate of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) in a rural sub-Saharan hospital. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: We analyzed the incidence of SSIs in a rural Tanzanian hospital with very limited resources and found that AMP was administered after incision in 88% without covering the expected pathogens. Inadequacy and mistiming of AMP proved to be major risk factors for SSI in this study. Subsequently, 21.6% of patients developed an SSI after clean or clean-contaminated surgery, with 60% of detected pathogens being resistant to the administered antibiotics. In developed countries, preoperative single shot AMP is widely used and effective in the prevention of SSI. METHODS: Implementation and monitoring of guidelines for routine and adequate single shot AMP within 2 hours prior to incision in every clean and clean-contaminated intervention. RESULTS: In the preintervention group, 527 patients qualified for routine AMP that was administered in 88% of patients after incision and did not cover the expected pathogens to a large extent.114 patients (21.6%) developed an SSI, with 60% of detected pathogens being resistant to the administered antibiotics. After implementation of the guidelines, the incidence of SSIs significantly decreased from 21.6% to 4% (11/276). CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of a single shot AMP dramatically decreased the rate of SSI in a hospital with very limited resources. Such guidelines, developed by industrialized countries, are even more effective in non-industrialized countries.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2009
Deposited On:29 Jan 2010 12:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:46
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0003-4932
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0b013e31819782fd
PubMed ID:19212189

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