Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of visual variables for geographic information visualization


Garlandini, S; Fabrikant, Sara I (2009). Evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of visual variables for geographic information visualization. In: Stewart Hornsby, K; et al. Spatial information theory. Berlin: Springer, 195-211.

Abstract

We propose an empirical, perception-based evaluation approach for assessing the effectiveness and efficiency of longstanding cartographic design principles applied to 2D map displays. The approach includes bottom-up visual saliency models that are compared with eye-movement data collected in human-subject experiments on map stimuli embedded in the so-called flicker paradigm. The proposed methods are applied to the assessment of four commonly used visual variables for designing 2D maps: size, color value, color hue, and orientation. The empirical results suggest that the visual variable size is the most efficient (fastest) and most effective (accurate) visual variable to detect change under flicker conditions. The visual variable orientation proved to be the least efficient and effective of the tested visual variables. These empirical results shed new light on the implied ranking of the visual variables that have been proposed over 40 years ago. With the presented approach we hope to provide cartographers, GIScientists and visualization designers a systematic assessment method to develop effective and efficient geovisualization displays.

Abstract

We propose an empirical, perception-based evaluation approach for assessing the effectiveness and efficiency of longstanding cartographic design principles applied to 2D map displays. The approach includes bottom-up visual saliency models that are compared with eye-movement data collected in human-subject experiments on map stimuli embedded in the so-called flicker paradigm. The proposed methods are applied to the assessment of four commonly used visual variables for designing 2D maps: size, color value, color hue, and orientation. The empirical results suggest that the visual variable size is the most efficient (fastest) and most effective (accurate) visual variable to detect change under flicker conditions. The visual variable orientation proved to be the least efficient and effective of the tested visual variables. These empirical results shed new light on the implied ranking of the visual variables that have been proposed over 40 years ago. With the presented approach we hope to provide cartographers, GIScientists and visualization designers a systematic assessment method to develop effective and efficient geovisualization displays.

Statistics

Citations

40 citations in Web of Science®
54 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 22 Jan 2010
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:22 Jan 2010 11:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:46
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Lecture Notes in Computer Science
Number:5756
ISSN:0302-9743 (P) 1611-3349 (E)
ISBN:978-3-642-03831-0
Additional Information:Proceedings of the 9th International Conference, COSIT 2009 Aber Wrac’h, France, September 21-25, 2009
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03832-7_12
Official URL:http://www.springerlink.com/content/g63034wk5176/
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005897126

Download