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A new incision technique to reduce tibiofemoral mismatch in rotationplasty - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Ossendorf, C; Exner, G U; Fuchs, B (2010). A new incision technique to reduce tibiofemoral mismatch in rotationplasty. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 468(5):1264-1268.

Abstract

Rotationplasty provides stable and durable biologic reconstruction after tumor resection around the knee and renders reliable results, in young patients. However, after resection of the tumor, there is often a mismatch between the circumference of the proximal (femoral) and the distal (tibial) parts. Because rotationplasty includes an intercalary amputation where the ends are readapted, there is always a mismatch of the proximal and distal circumferences of the soft tissue envelope. To facilitate skin closure without tension and to avoid impaired wound healing and subsequent infections, the type of incision is critical and must be carefully planned. We present a new incision technique for rotationplasty about the knee. Half of the difference of the incision length of the proximal and distal circumferences represents the base of the triangle proximally, medially and laterally of the thigh. After adapting both ends, the peak of this flat triangle is distally adapted via a vertical incision which allows it to match unequal circumferences. This technique was used in eight patients, in all of whom the wounds healed uneventfully.

Abstract

Rotationplasty provides stable and durable biologic reconstruction after tumor resection around the knee and renders reliable results, in young patients. However, after resection of the tumor, there is often a mismatch between the circumference of the proximal (femoral) and the distal (tibial) parts. Because rotationplasty includes an intercalary amputation where the ends are readapted, there is always a mismatch of the proximal and distal circumferences of the soft tissue envelope. To facilitate skin closure without tension and to avoid impaired wound healing and subsequent infections, the type of incision is critical and must be carefully planned. We present a new incision technique for rotationplasty about the knee. Half of the difference of the incision length of the proximal and distal circumferences represents the base of the triangle proximally, medially and laterally of the thigh. After adapting both ends, the peak of this flat triangle is distally adapted via a vertical incision which allows it to match unequal circumferences. This technique was used in eight patients, in all of whom the wounds healed uneventfully.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2010
Deposited On:04 Mar 2010 16:07
Last Modified:07 Jan 2017 08:12
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0009-921X
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11999-009-1093-2
PubMed ID:19756901

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