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Desert ants do not acquire and use a three-dimensional vector - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Grah, Gunnar; Wehner, Rüdiger; Ronacher, Bernhard (2007). Desert ants do not acquire and use a three-dimensional vector. Frontiers in Zoology, 4:12.

Abstract

Background: Desert ants (Cataglyphis fortis) are central place foragers that navigate by means of path integration. This mechanism remains accurate even on three-dimensional itineraries. In this study, we tested three hypotheses concerning the underlying principles of Cataglyphis' orientation in 3-D: (1) Do the ants employ a strictly two-dimensional representation of their itineraries, (2) do they link additional information about ascents and descents to their 2-D home vector, or (3) do they use true 3-D vector navigation? Results: We trained ants to walk routes within channels that included ascents and descents. In choice tests, ants walked on ramps more frequently and at greater lengths if their preceding journey also included vertical components. However, the sequence of ascents and descents, as well as their distance from nest and feeder, were not retraced. Importantly, the animals did not compensate for an enforced vertical deviation from the home vector. Conclusion: We conclude that Cataglyphis fortis essentially represents its environment in a simplified, two-dimensional fashion, with information about vertical path segments being learnt, but independently from their congruence with the actual three-dimensional configuration of the environment. Our findings render the existence of a path integration mechanism that is functional in all three dimensions highly unlikely.

Abstract

Background: Desert ants (Cataglyphis fortis) are central place foragers that navigate by means of path integration. This mechanism remains accurate even on three-dimensional itineraries. In this study, we tested three hypotheses concerning the underlying principles of Cataglyphis' orientation in 3-D: (1) Do the ants employ a strictly two-dimensional representation of their itineraries, (2) do they link additional information about ascents and descents to their 2-D home vector, or (3) do they use true 3-D vector navigation? Results: We trained ants to walk routes within channels that included ascents and descents. In choice tests, ants walked on ramps more frequently and at greater lengths if their preceding journey also included vertical components. However, the sequence of ascents and descents, as well as their distance from nest and feeder, were not retraced. Importantly, the animals did not compensate for an enforced vertical deviation from the home vector. Conclusion: We conclude that Cataglyphis fortis essentially represents its environment in a simplified, two-dimensional fashion, with information about vertical path segments being learnt, but independently from their congruence with the actual three-dimensional configuration of the environment. Our findings render the existence of a path integration mechanism that is functional in all three dimensions highly unlikely.

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:3 May 2007
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:14
Last Modified:11 Aug 2017 13:51
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1742-9994
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-9994-4-12
PubMed ID:17475021

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