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Strong impact of micrometastatic tumor cell load in patients with esophageal carcinoma


Koenig, A M; Prenzel, K L; Bogoevski, D; Yekebas, E F; Bubenheim, M; Faithova, L; Vashist, Y K; Gawad, K A; Baldus, S E; Pantel, K; Schneider, P M; Hölscher, A H; Izbicki, J R (2009). Strong impact of micrometastatic tumor cell load in patients with esophageal carcinoma. Annals of Surgical Oncology, 16(2):454-462.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: To assess the role of immunohistochemically detectable nodal microinvolvement of patients with "curatively" resected esophageal carcinoma. METHODS: In 73 patients with resectable esophageal carcinoma [squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), n = 45 (61.6%); adenocarcinoma (AC), n = 28 (38.4%)] a total of 2174 lymph nodes (LN) were removed. In each of the 1958 LN classified as negative on conventional histopathology, immunohistochemistry was performed using the anticytokeratin antibody AE1/AE3. To determine the role of the amount of residual tumor load, the patients were grouped according to the percentage of LN affected with micrometastasis (0%, <11%, and > or =11%). RESULTS: Tumor cells were immunohistochemically detected in 47 LN (2.4%) from 25 (34.2%) patients. Five-year overall survival probability (5-YSP) of 30% in pN(0 )patients with detected occult tumor cells in LN was significantly worse than that in those without nodal microinvolvement (76%, P = 0.021), hereby resembling that of pN1-patients (24%, P = 0.84). Median overall survival in patients with no (0%), low (<11%), and high (>11%) micrometastatic tumor load was 43, 27, and 11 months, respectively. Substratification according to histological type showed that, in patients with AC, the presence of nodal microinvolvement had a significant impact on 5-YSP (0% versus 65%; P = 0.03), whereas in patients with SCC, differences of 5-YSP were only of borderline significance (24% versus 53%; P = 0.081). CONCLUSION: Minimal tumor cell load as assessed by the ratio of micrometastatically affected LN is a complementary tool for better risk stratification of patients with esophageal carcinoma.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: To assess the role of immunohistochemically detectable nodal microinvolvement of patients with "curatively" resected esophageal carcinoma. METHODS: In 73 patients with resectable esophageal carcinoma [squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), n = 45 (61.6%); adenocarcinoma (AC), n = 28 (38.4%)] a total of 2174 lymph nodes (LN) were removed. In each of the 1958 LN classified as negative on conventional histopathology, immunohistochemistry was performed using the anticytokeratin antibody AE1/AE3. To determine the role of the amount of residual tumor load, the patients were grouped according to the percentage of LN affected with micrometastasis (0%, <11%, and > or =11%). RESULTS: Tumor cells were immunohistochemically detected in 47 LN (2.4%) from 25 (34.2%) patients. Five-year overall survival probability (5-YSP) of 30% in pN(0 )patients with detected occult tumor cells in LN was significantly worse than that in those without nodal microinvolvement (76%, P = 0.021), hereby resembling that of pN1-patients (24%, P = 0.84). Median overall survival in patients with no (0%), low (<11%), and high (>11%) micrometastatic tumor load was 43, 27, and 11 months, respectively. Substratification according to histological type showed that, in patients with AC, the presence of nodal microinvolvement had a significant impact on 5-YSP (0% versus 65%; P = 0.03), whereas in patients with SCC, differences of 5-YSP were only of borderline significance (24% versus 53%; P = 0.081). CONCLUSION: Minimal tumor cell load as assessed by the ratio of micrometastatically affected LN is a complementary tool for better risk stratification of patients with esophageal carcinoma.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:30 Jan 2010 11:09
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 23:37
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1068-9265
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1245/s10434-008-0169-7
PubMed ID:19015923

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