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Frost tolerance in excised leaves of the common bugle (Ajuga reptans L.) correlates positively with the concentrations of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Peters, S; Keller, F (2009). Frost tolerance in excised leaves of the common bugle (Ajuga reptans L.) correlates positively with the concentrations of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs). Plant, Cell and Environment, 32(8):1099-1107.

Abstract

Mass increases in raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs, alpha1,6-galactosyl extensions of sucrose) are well documented in the generative tissues of many plants upon cold acclimation, and they (i.e. mainly the two shortest RFO members, raffinose and stachyose) have been suggested as frost stress protectants. Our focus here was on the longer RFO members as they commonly occur in the frost-hardy evergreen labiate Ajuga reptans in its natural habitat, and accumulate to their highest concentrations in winter when the plant is faced with sub-zero temperatures. We examined the effects of RFO concentration and chain length on frost tolerance using excised leaves which accumulate long-chain RFOs under both cold and warm conditions, thereby uncoupling the acclimation temperature from RFO production. We demonstrated that frost tolerance in excised A. reptans leaves correlates positively with long-chain RFO accumulation under both acclimation temperatures. After 24 d post-excision in the warm, the leaves had increased their RFO concentrations (mainly long-chain RFOs) 22-fold to 78 mg g(-1) fresh weight, and decreased their EL(50) values (temperature at which 50% leakage occurred) from -10.5 to -24.5 degrees C, suggesting a protective role for these oligosaccharides in the natural frost tolerance of A. reptans.

Abstract

Mass increases in raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs, alpha1,6-galactosyl extensions of sucrose) are well documented in the generative tissues of many plants upon cold acclimation, and they (i.e. mainly the two shortest RFO members, raffinose and stachyose) have been suggested as frost stress protectants. Our focus here was on the longer RFO members as they commonly occur in the frost-hardy evergreen labiate Ajuga reptans in its natural habitat, and accumulate to their highest concentrations in winter when the plant is faced with sub-zero temperatures. We examined the effects of RFO concentration and chain length on frost tolerance using excised leaves which accumulate long-chain RFOs under both cold and warm conditions, thereby uncoupling the acclimation temperature from RFO production. We demonstrated that frost tolerance in excised A. reptans leaves correlates positively with long-chain RFO accumulation under both acclimation temperatures. After 24 d post-excision in the warm, the leaves had increased their RFO concentrations (mainly long-chain RFOs) 22-fold to 78 mg g(-1) fresh weight, and decreased their EL(50) values (temperature at which 50% leakage occurred) from -10.5 to -24.5 degrees C, suggesting a protective role for these oligosaccharides in the natural frost tolerance of A. reptans.

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32 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:30 Jan 2010 18:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:48
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0140-7791
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3040.2009.01991.x
PubMed ID:19422612

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